Checking studs and jewelry pre-match (first game)

#21
I am being assess for promotion for the first time this year. I have been told specifically it is expected I check all players for jewelry and boots and shin pads before the match with advise to get them to line up as the easiest way. Before the match, tell both teams substitutions will be done from the half way line and I should check the players equipment there before he enters the field.

I don't find this hard within the half hour i arrive early. I find with about 10 mins to go teams are often in a group. Catch them then, have a polite chat and ask nicely. Most respect its something which you have to do.
 

Trip

Well-Known Member
#22
And on jewellery, if somebody catches their ear ring and the FA contact you to ask if you did the checks, what do you say? I didn't check but I just told the manager to make sure?
I am absolutely meticulous about checking jewellery.

If you want to join the group of referees who are only interested in wagging their fingers at colleagues on this forum then by all means, knock yourself out, but don't make stuff up.
 
#25
Can you point out where Big Cat said he doesn't check jewellery?
Big cat didn't - I've cross posted there.

However, you have said your process is to just tell the manager about jewelry and book players accordingly, yet continue to say you're meticulous about checking jewelry. I'm not trying to wag the finger at you, but I'm struggling to work out when you're actually checking.
 
#26
If your mind is getting preoccupied on this matter, here is what i would do (and i stress, only what I would do)

When you are saying hi to each coach, getting team lines, whatever the situation is, I would ask "what colours are you today, " or some other basic random not committal small talk then throw in "can you make sure your guys have all jewelry removed please".
Job done

if then you spot something either before kick off, or at worst, during the game, you can then instruct them as the situation dictates.

It absolutely riles me up to see a referee regimentaly lining up players on the park like drill instructors then miss numerous blatent fouls during the game

Again i stress, if I was hung up on jewelry, this is only how I would approach it.
Have to agree with Ciley there. Regarding OP's remark as to how its done 'at the top', they sometimes post 'tunnel cam' footage on QPR web site and equipment check at that level by ARs I have seen on there is 'cursory' to say the least! Of course, the obvious argument is that professionals would be expected to get basic equipment correct I guess.
 

RobOda

Well-Known Member
#28
^^^ you would be wrong ^^ its not a cautionable offence. Which means, you are making things up as you go along. Which gives the referees who are doing the correct thing an even harder time. You are also taking a match fee and not adhering to the LOTG.
It is though?

Law 4: (I've paraphrased...)

If a player is wearing jewellery the referee must order the player to:

- Remove the item
- Leave the field of play at the next stoppage if the player is unable or unwilling to comply.

A player who refuses to comply, or wears the item again must be cautioned.


Fair enough the way @Trip goes about it might be in error, but still...
 

Trip

Well-Known Member
#29
However, you have said your process is to just tell the manager about jewelry and book players accordingly
That isn't what I said. I said I tell managers to make sure jewellery is removed and that I will caution any player with metal jewellery on the pitch. (I also said I've never actually cautioned anyone for wearing jewellery.) I didn't say that I don't check for jewellery. I even provided an example (of wedding rings taped).

In seven years I've missed an item of jewellery that I've later spotted only once, and that was metal stud through a piercing at the back of the neck.
 
#30
Probably surprising to some of the younger refs on here but sharpening your studs was pretty common practice when I first started playing 25 years ago! Refs often used to line us up (South Manchester Leagues) and run their palms over the studs of each player and often this was done in the changing rooms whilst people were sat down so the ref could see the bottom of your boots.
 

Trip

Well-Known Member
#31
Probably surprising to some of the younger refs on here but sharpening your studs was pretty common practice when I first started playing 25 years ago!
Holy cow, where did you start playing? In prison?

I've played football almost every week since the late 1970s and I've never even heard of sharpening studs.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#32
Probably surprising to some of the younger refs on here but sharpening your studs was pretty common practice when I first started playing 25 years ago! Refs often used to line us up (South Manchester Leagues) and run their palms over the studs of each player and often this was done in the changing rooms whilst people were sat down so the ref could see the bottom of your boots.
How long where you in for? :p:D
 
#33
LOL. It wasn't even that long ago (I'm still a young lad, or that's what I tell myself!) but when I was U16-U18 my mum used to try and get me to cut my fingernails and I refused saying "I'm leaving them long because it hurts the other team better". You'd be surprised at the difference between some "legal" contact with sharp long fingernails and short fingernails....much easier to give the opponents a little nudge/dig and inflict an electric shock sort of feeling at throw ins etc.

You better get checking fingernails as well. I devised that tactic myself even if I was a "creative midfielder"! Fortunately there isn't a water fight police but I also had the bright idea of putting stones and small gravel in my water-gun during a neighbourhood water fight to "get" Luke and Sam at number 63 who were our rivals. That didn't work out so well...ended up blocking the hole but I was a little sh*t!
 
#34
@benchwarmer - to the question that you posted... Yes, do check for jewellery and also check boots. These are the essential checks you should be making before every game. Other checks, e.g. under-short/under-shirt colour, use common sense and apply the spirit of the game, dependent upon the level of football - if necessary, play the game and report where necessary afterwards - you are there to facilitate anywhere between 18 and 30 youngsters running around kicking a football about, and to do so as safely as possible.

As to when you perform the equipment check, you'll work out the best opportunity to do this - either when the team are in a huddle with the manager talking to them, or just before kick-off (do the teams have to perform an ID check for example before KO, to make sure players are registered?). If you don't get any other opportunity, walk over to the team's manager and ask that he bring his team together for a kit check. I've not had a match where any one has complained about this being done - the youth teams down this way all expect it.

To all those naysayers, wouldn't it be nice if we could get the adult footballers of tomorrow used to best practice today, so that the mumbles and grumbles are diminished? If you can't be bothered performing these checks, you know which week's ref you become.
 
#35
@benchwarmer - to the question that you posted... Yes, do check for jewellery and also check boots. These are the essential checks you should be making before every game. Other checks, e.g. under-short/under-shirt colour, use common sense and apply the spirit of the game, dependent upon the level of football - if necessary, play the game and report where necessary afterwards - you are there to facilitate anywhere between 18 and 30 youngsters running around kicking a football about, and to do so as safely as possible.

As to when you perform the equipment check, you'll work out the best opportunity to do this - either when the team are in a huddle with the manager talking to them, or just before kick-off (do the teams have to perform an ID check for example before KO, to make sure players are registered?). If you don't get any other opportunity, walk over to the team's manager and ask that he bring his team together for a kit check. I've not had a match where any one has complained about this being done - the youth teams down this way all expect it.

To all those naysayers, wouldn't it be nice if we could get the adult footballers of tomorrow used to best practice today, so that the mumbles and grumbles are diminished? If you can't be bothered performing these checks, you know which week's ref you become.
And when you're glancing at studs smothered in mud and not paying any attention to what you're looking at, what is it you'll be looking for, assuming NorthLondonRef isn't playing; and realistically, what is your chances of finding WOMD?
 
#37
I never knew what I was looking for when I checked player's footwear; one on each foot? No running spikes? No adaptations? Explosives?........
I've always understood that you're looking for missing studs (for that player's own safety) and broken or damaged studs (for the safety of anyone he tackles). What you choose to do about it if you spot either of those things is up to you.
 
#39
Regarding OP's remark as to how its done 'at the top', they sometimes post 'tunnel cam' footage on QPR web site and equipment check at that level by ARs I have seen on there is 'cursory' to say the least! Of course, the obvious argument is that professionals would be expected to get basic equipment correct I guess.
There's a far more detailed inspection done outside the chanrge rooms, and yes, the tunnel one is a cursory double-check.
 

Sheffields Finest

Maybe I'm foolish, Maybe I'm blind!
#40
Always did my jewellery check during the game and it always came off (if it could), no excuses. The Studs thing was a bit silly IMO, players dont wear running spikes and if you think i'm running my hands over 50+ dog sh1t laden boots you can think again. It usually happened in semi finals and finals but in all my career Ive never seen ANY referee do it around my parts for normal games. Sorry if that upsets the Weetabix Kids but i'm saying how it was.
I never ever saw an injury caused by a defective boot, so 500+ games x 90 minutes without incident is a pretty safe operation to allow!! I had much much bigger things to worry about than that believe me!!
 
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