RefSix

Intimidation

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#41
I once got into a yelling debate with a player at 20 yards. Went on for 10 to 20 seconds
One of those unwanted learning experiences after which a pledge is made 'never to repeat'. Unfortunately, the only real way to improve, is to stumble across the wrong way to go about things
I felt like a right tit
 

RobOda

RefChat Addict
#42
I find most players wilt if you just stand up to them and look unphased. More so if you bring the card out.

Nine times out of ten players trying to be intimidating are all bark and no bite. There's not much point worrying about the one out of ten times though, since if they cross the line there's nothing you or anyone else can reasonably do about it, so don't let fear rule your refereeing.
 
#45
As a fairly new ref I've made the point to senior peers that I've just not experienced players attempting to intimidate me. They stand up, look at me and sometimes step in towards me but always stop about three or four foot from me. I guess it helps I'm 6'3? Sorry if that doesn't help....
 

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#46
As a fairly new ref I've made the point to senior peers that I've just not experienced players attempting to intimidate me. They stand up, look at me and sometimes step in towards me but always stop about three or four foot from me. I guess it helps I'm 6'3? Sorry if that doesn't help....
You just haven't done any difficult games yet then (I'm 6'3 btw, 6'5 in high heels)
 
#47
Both I guess. Personally I only get the card out if I'm going to caution/dismiss them. If I want them to think twice, I bring out my notebook instead. :D
For new refs: Never pull a card from your pocket unless you are going to use it. You are going to look weak. You can sometimes get the similar effect while putting your hand in your shorts pocket where you keep the card--the threat is implicit.

I once got into a yelling debate with a player at 20 yards. Went on for 10 to 20 seconds
One of those unwanted learning experiences after which a pledge is made 'never to repeat'. Unfortunately, the only real way to improve, is to stumble across the wrong way to go about things
I felt like a right tit
Again for new refs: @Big Cat learned from his mistake--and thanks this site, you can learn from it without having to make that mistake yourself! Yelling a players is a losing proposition--you don't have to yell because you hold the cards. (Sorry about the pun...) As referees, we don't have to win arguments or get players to agree with us. We just need them to comply with appropriate behavior. Calm does that best. And when it's done, you can simply say--calmly!-- that you have heard what they said but the conversation is over and we need to move on.
 
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