RefSix

Running the line Sunday

  • Thread starter Deleted member 3014
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D

Deleted member 3014

Guest
#1
And really not happy about it, it feels like a demotion & also a step backwards.

My league have been great to me since joining and have made sure I’ve got a game every week so I can’t complain to much but I’m just not looking forward to it, I’m ref’n Saturday so Atleast I’ve got a game this wknd but Sunday I feel a bit put out tbh.

Half the money & just up down the touch line for 90mins, I really considered declining the opportunity but a fellow ref and a mate talked me into it, i could have played for my old team Sunday if I had a day off from refereeing but I’ve now agreed to run the line.

I didn’t want to let the league down as they’ve been good to me & I also didn’t want to hamper my chances of future appointments so I’m gonna do it but I’ll make it clear to the league next week that I’d prefer in future not to run the line.

So any thoughts? At the end of the day two months ago I was still a player it was a big transition into being a ref & now this feels like a kick in the nuts id rather play for my old team than be a Lino.

You may all think stupid selfish me but I’m sorry it’s just the way I feel.
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#3
Being an assistant referee will be a very important factor in your development as a referee.

1) you'll get to watch an experienced referee ply their trade which will help you.
2) its not a demotion. Its part of the job.
3) if you want to progress up the levels of refereeing assisting is a major part of that. At my level I do more lines than middles but I am assisting on semi-pro games sometimes.
4) at your level so.e of your most prestige appointments will be as an assistant referee.
5) go out and enjoy the experience.

Go and look through the various threads on here for hints and tips on lining... not as straightforward as it might seem..
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#4
Part of the role of refereeing is running the line, you just need to get used to it I'm afraid. Certainly if you have any aspirations of promotions, as anyone who has been level 4 will tell you at that level you do far more lines than middles.
I was just writing it as you said it ;)
 

cwyeary

RefChat Addict
#5
I can't help you out with your feelings on being assigned an AR because I don't understand the UK referee/assigning culture. Being assigned as an AR is apart of the job for me and it's a terrible attitude to have to think it's beneath you. I'll leave that to the UK refs on here. However, since you are new to this I can recommend taking an offside perception test.

https://www.proassistantreferees.com/perception-test-7

It'll be 15 clips. Decide if the player is onside or offside then select the video frame where the players were when the ball was played. Let me know how you did. I'm curious to see what biases (if any) a new AR has.
 

markref

Active Member
#6
I was just writing it as you said it ;)
So was I!

It may feel like "just" running the line, but it's actually a really good opportunity to be part of a Referee team for the first time. To get promoted you will need to be an assistant as well as a referee, especially level four and above, so it's useful preparation for that. It will give you a completely different perspective on the act of refereeing, one that you won't get even from watching from the sidelines or on television, because you are involved in the decisions made during the game.

The fact that you are being given a line suggests that you will also be given a line on a semi-final / final. We have a lot of referees around here who never do lines, except for finals, and this really shows. They are not used to it and make some real howlers. It is also a really good opportunity to watch how a more experienced Referee handles the match.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#7
Don't forget that you're a NAR, which carried a lot more responsibility with it than you would designate to a CAR when you're in the middle. The referee will be expecting to be able to rely on you for every offside and many throw in/GK/corner decisions near you as a minimum, so you'll need one eye on each of those possibilities whenever the ball's near you. You'll also be expected to have some input into fouls and misconduct, so....grow a third eye for that I guess?

Also (and forgive me if I've got you mixed up with someone else here), didn't you post a thread a few weeks ago where you were slating some CAR's you'd had? Well, time to give it a go and see if it's as easy as you thought! Approach with an open mind, follow the referee's instructions and see what you think - you might find you enjoy it more than being in the middle.

Regardless, I certainly wouldn't go kicking up a fuss to the league - the fact that you're at all involved in a match that requires NAR's is more than likely considered to be a step up for you by the powers that be. Turn that down and you'll easily find yourself labelled as difficult and get stuck with the lower division cloggers. If you're going to get to a level where you're the guy in the middle with NAR's, you'll need to have picked up tips and tricks from the guys who have done it before, so treat this as a learning experience as well. If you're lucky, the ref will be being observed and you might be able to get some feedback off him as well.
 

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#9
MIB... How many games are you planning on covering before going back for the debrief and exam? Not sure you're meant to blitz it beyond 5 games
 

RefJef

Well-Known Member
#10
Second only to being observed/mentored, running the line is the next best thing to do to improve as a referee.

Watch, listen and work with the man in the middle. You’ll learn a lot about game management, interaction with coaching staff etc, and how to “be the Boss” when you’re the man in the middle running a team of three with neutral assistants

I’ll be honest, if far rather ref than line, but I do a handful of lines now and then, all part of the ongoing learning process.
 
D

Deleted member 3014

Guest
#11
It is a semi final of a cup.
I understand to climb the pyramid you have to run the line in leagues above you before u ref in them but I’m just not feeling it, it’s not I feel it’s beneath me it’s simply I’d rather be playing or ref’n myself.

Second only to being observed/mentored, running the line is the next best thing to do to improve as a referee.

Watch, listen and work with the man in the middle. You’ll learn a lot about game management, interaction with coaching staff etc, and how to “be the Boss” when you’re the man in the middle running a team of three with neutral assistants

I’ll be honest, if far rather ref than line, but I do a handful of lines now and then, all part of the ongoing learning process.
The whole reason I became a ref is because they were notoriously bad in our league now I’ve got to assist one of them.

It's fun, and the ref usually buys you a beer post-match. What's not to like?
I don’t drink

MIB... How many games are you planning on covering before going back for the debrief and exam? Not sure you're meant to blitz it beyond 5 games
Haven’t given it much thought tbh if offered games I take them plus the season hasn’t got long left so I’m just cracking on with it.

Don't forget that you're a NAR, which carried a lot more responsibility with it than you would designate to a CAR when you're in the middle. The referee will be expecting to be able to rely on you for every offside and many throw in/GK/corner decisions near you as a minimum, so you'll need one eye on each of those possibilities whenever the ball's near you. You'll also be expected to have some input into fouls and misconduct, so....grow a third eye for that I guess?

Also (and forgive me if I've got you mixed up with someone else here), didn't you post a thread a few weeks ago where you were slating some CAR's you'd had? Well, time to give it a go and see if it's as easy as you thought! Approach with an open mind, follow the referee's instructions and see what you think - you might find you enjoy it more than being in the middle.

Regardless, I certainly wouldn't go kicking up a fuss to the league - the fact that you're at all involved in a match that requires NAR's is more than likely considered to be a step up for you by the powers that be. Turn that down and you'll easily find yourself labelled as difficult and get stuck with the lower division cloggers. If you're going to get to a level where you're the guy in the middle with NAR's, you'll need to have picked up tips and tricks from the guys who have done it before, so treat this as a learning experience as well. If you're lucky, the ref will be being observed and you might be able to get some feedback off him as well.
I’ve taken that all on board Graeme yes I’ve had issues with Lino’s so we’ll see how I get on.

Just feel like I’ve got a head chefs job and two months into it they’ve put me on the dishes.
 

es1

RefChat Addict
#12
The more apt comparison is that you've been working in your own kitchen for a few weeks practicing. Now you've been invited to a restaurant to learn from a more experienced chef.

It's a cup semi final man, you take what you're given and be grateful for it!
 

PP62

Well-Known Member
#13
MIB, are you just doing it for the money or are you trying to make a hobby of refereeing?

We had a presentation at our RA a couple of seasons ago by an ex premier league assistant. It was titled "Just running the line" and covered the importance of assistant referees at any level. It was a brilliant presentation.

I don't do many lines these days, been there and done that as a level 4. But I had an email today from our supply league appointments secretary asking if I would run a line next Tuesday due to a lack of assistants midweek availability. My immediate response was "of course I'll do it". It certainly isn't beneath me and I will enjoy it.

Go out on Sunday, take it all in and learn from it. You might even have a good time!
 

Mintyref

RefChat Addict
#15
If this is a cup semi final, then these are usually given to referees that have had the better club marks during the season. Look at it as a 'reward' for doing well.
These appointments were the only time I worked as a team of three. I enjoyed assisting, I found working with two NARs strange but I looked upon it as a credit.
( ps wait while you get a county appointed cup final and all you get is a trophy!)
 
D

Deleted member 3014

Guest
#16
I can only be honest guys I wasnt gonna sugar coat it, I’ve agreed to it & I’ll embrace it.

I’ve got the bug for refereeing & didn’t invest time & money to be a lino, here I go again sounding like an ungrateful brat but then again to flip it around I’ve found out that certain refs in my league have requested no Lino appointments they want to referee & referee only!
 

cwyeary

RefChat Addict
#18
I’ve found out that certain refs in my league have requested no Lino appointments they want to referee & referee only!
And those are refs who will probably never move up the ladder to higher level games. I don't know what your aspirations are, but to view an assignment as a "lino" to be beneath you then you'll stay pretty much at the level you are now.
 
D

Deleted member 3014

Guest
#19
And those are refs who will probably never move up the ladder to higher level games. I don't know what your aspirations are, but to view an assignment as a "lino" to be beneath you then you'll stay pretty much at the level you are now.
I don’t see it as beneath me I just would prefer to ref & given the choice I wouldn’t run the line, probably being a footballer for 20yrs doesn’t help, I’ve akways seen a Lino as a little mans job & the forgotten man on the pitch the annoying little runt that ruins your goal celebration
 

es1

RefChat Addict
#20
It's a completely separate skill to refereeing, one you might find you excel at!

You'll also find that you run the line on games that are above the level you ref at (in general).
 
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