Ref4Me

Open Age Jewellery Check

JP1

New Member
Level 7 Referee
I’m 7 games in and realised I’ve never done a jewellery or shin pad check.

How do you deal with this, Practically how and when do you do it?
 
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FC555

New Member
Level 7 Referee
For me I either loiter near the changing rooms entrance and glance at them all as they come out, or do it while they're warming up and I'm checking the pitch/goals (I've noticed some players warm up without shin pads, I tend to just ask them and then again glance to see if they've got them right before kick off).

For the youth I go around when they're all grouped up while their manager is talking to them. 9 times out of 10 I can clearly see their equipment is all good but just so I don't do it in total silence I tend to go 'Have we all got shinpads? And no jewellery?'
 

RobOda

RefChat Addict
Level 3 Referee
I’m 7 games in and realised I’ve never done a jewellery or shin pad check.

Never? Not even for subs? ;)

You definitely should be checking for this stuff during the subs procedure, that's a perfect time to examine a sub's equipment etc.

But for pre-match:

At grassroots, ideally you'll have a look during warm ups and as they come out of the changing rooms when you've blasted the whistle to indicate they need to come out. The latter has become less common due to COVID restrictions, most teams stay out now. But this may change as the restrictions have ended.

If you spot an issue during the warm ups, that's the best time to raise it (undershirt's wrong colour etc), as it'll give them time to sort it.

I find it handy to talk to the manager pre-match if the match is one where jewellery may be prevalent - Ladies games in particular, especially because some people seem to think ladies = jewellery is fine to use.

The higher the tiers, the less checking you'll need to do theoretically as they should know better, but it pays to due to a cursory check. We don't do the old days thing of lining everyone up for checks - or I've never seen it happen anyway.
 

Referoo

New Member
Level 6 Referee
I must be the odd one out, RobOda.

When I'm in the middle with cARs, I always speak to managers to line up, semi-cercle the players, check their boots, look for missing shin pads, ask them to remove any accessories that should not be worn. Also speak to them regarding what expected of them and the way I would like to be approached. Always mention that RESPECT is paramount.

Some team seem baffled which means that not many referees are doing it, but no trouble whatsoever.

Obviously, when I am an AR, we check boots and accessories/jewellery outside the changing rooms doors or in the tunnel.
 

zarathustra

Premium Member
Premium Member
Level 6 Referee
I normally have an informal check while the players are warming up.

I don’t like the whole getting the teams lined up like children routine, and at parks level it’s not really practical to hang around outside the changing rooms.
 

Ben448844

RefChat Addict
Level 4 Referee
I normally have an informal check while the players are warming up.

I don’t like the whole getting the teams lined up like children routine, and at parks level it’s not really practical to hang around outside the changing rooms.

Yeah I've never lined adults up for an inspection. Had it done to me as a player on Sunday League and if I'm honest we just thought the ref was over officious and it put them on the back foot straight away.

I approach teams during the warm up and tell them to remove jewellery etc. Usually stand next to the manager and say it so hopefully he will enforce it for you too. Have a scan around and if you see any then ensure that you tell the player to remove it. This will encourage others to do the same. I think I've seen a player with no shin pads once in my 5 years reffing, and that was a sub who forgot to put them on. Never seen a player start a game with no pads. Not something you need to spend any real time on.
 

Will_A

Premium Member
Premium Member
Level 4 Referee
During my time playing (15years) at grassroots level, any ref that gathered the teams together to tell them what they expected etc before the game was generally thought of as a bit of a d**k and would actually get less respect that the refs that left us to warm up and just spoke to the manager & captain.

Rightly or wrongly, it always put that referee on the back foot from the first whistle!
 

santa sangria

RefChat Addict
I must be the odd one out, RobOda.

When I'm in the middle with cARs, I always speak to managers to line up, semi-cercle the players, check their boots, look for missing shin pads, ask them to remove any accessories that should not be worn. Also speak to them regarding what expected of them and the way I would like to be approached. Always mention that RESPECT is paramount.

Some team seem baffled which means that not many referees are doing it, but no trouble whatsoever.

Obviously, when I am an AR, we check boots and accessories/jewellery outside the changing rooms doors or in the tunnel.
This semi-circle of players… obvs each to his/her own but this seems very unusual and, as others have said, not likely to help build relationships.

Have you got wider context for this, are you trained to do this, where are you, do other refs in the levels just above you do this?
 

Kes

I'll Decide ...
Level 5 Referee
When I'm in the middle with cARs, I always speak to managers to line up, semi-cercle the players, . Also speak to them regarding what expected of them and the way I would like to be approached. Always mention that RESPECT is paramount.
Some team seem baffled which means that not many referees are doing it, but no trouble whatsoever.
Not surprised some seem baffled. I'd guess you're probably the only ref they have that does that.

I'd never do anything like that.

1. They're not really listening, they just want to get on with the game, (and since when has anything a referee has said along those lines before a game ever made a blind bit of difference to how they behave once the whistle goes anyway?).

2. It's more likely to irritate the players and as a referee, single me out as some sort of officious "jobsworth" before the match even starts. :wtf:

Remember, the sad fact is that most players view a referee as something akin to a failed copper or a wannabe traffic warden. Sad but true. I'd never do anything that help perpetuate or reinforce that view. ;)

Just my own opinion obviously .... :cool:
 

ARF

RefChat Addict
I think I've seen a player with no shin pads once in my 5 years reffing, and that was a sub who forgot to put them on. Never seen a player start a game with no pads. Not something you need to spend any real time on.
Not sure if it was missed by the AR or if he took them off during the game/at half time, but earlier this season about 10 minutes into the second half I had the away team captain point out that one of the home players had no shinpads on, and this was on a Step 5 game.
 

Max2

Well-Known Member
Level 3 Referee
Players should be (legally) responsible for their own equipment (or lack of), and then be removed to correct if/when a match official notices, rather than it being OUR problem from the get go, and that should be reflected in LOTG.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
Level 5 Referee
At every step 7/6+ game I've ever done, an AR has been expected to loiter around outside changing rooms and check - and that's not considered overly-officious?

If everyone advocating against checks is happy to put their own necks on the line at grassroots then fair enough, but I don't think that's the advice we should be handing out in the "New Referee" forum. It is part of the job you're being paid for to do some kind of kit check - even if that is just standing nearby while a team is stretching and casting an eye over them.

Ideally you just pop in and have a quick word while they're stretching, but if you can't manage that, current laws expect you to do something more proactive than just assuming they're ok and correcting issues as they come up, even if I agree with @Max2 that this would be a much more sensible approach.
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
At every step 7/6+ game I've ever done, an AR has been expected to loiter around outside changing rooms and check - and that's not considered overly-officious?

If everyone advocating against checks is happy to put their own necks on the line at grassroots then fair enough, but I don't think that's the advice we should be handing out in the "New Referee" forum. It is part of the job you're being paid for to do some kind of kit check - even if that is just standing nearby while a team is stretching and casting an eye over them.

Ideally you just pop in and have a quick word while they're stretching, but if you can't manage that, current laws expect you to do something more proactive than just assuming they're ok and correcting issues as they come up, even if I agree with @Max2 that this would be a much more sensible approach.
Much easier at that level though, as the players will almost always be coming out together from a changing room, not something that usually happens at grass roots.

At grass roots I walk around them as they are warming up, looking for any obvious problems, at the same time verbally asking / prompting them.
 

DJIC

New Member
it is also a mandatory check, so if you are being observed, will be an automatic fail for a mark that qualifies for promotion, my advice get in to good habits every match whatever works for you in a kit check, but do something.
 

santa sangria

RefChat Addict
We have a clear divide: higher levels there’s a ceremonial kit check outside the changing rooms before we lead them on to the field.

At lower levels we take a look around before kick off. Common sense approach is if I see lots if bling on the sidelines while we are waiting I will be proactive, and if I see anything silly in the warm up then everyone gets a quick shout.

Still trying to understand if there is somewhere where it is normal for the ref to address both teams standing around the centre circle - because @GraemeS surely this is something most of us would advise a beginner ref against doing…?
 

Peter Grove

RefChat Addict
Players should be (legally) responsible for their own equipment (or lack of), and then be removed to correct if/when a match official notices, rather than it being OUR problem from the get go, and that should be reflected in LOTG.
No, because that would allow both for a potentially dangerous situation to exist and (more importantly) for a player potentially to be injured before the referee would notice and take action.

The safety of the players should be paramount and allowing players to take to the field wearing something that poses a danger to themselves or others is not the best way to safeguard the players' well-being.
 

Macca

Member
I had two incidents recently - one where a player had a nose ring and kept his hand covering his nose when I lined them up for a boot check. He denied having anything when I asked even though it was obvious. I told him he can't play unless it is removed. After the boot check he went over to remove it and instead put tape over it (which obviously can't cover a nose ring). I told him nope!
The other - ear ring in the middle of the ear (not lobe) covered with small plaster. He told me it was just a cut so had a plaster and when I asked to see, he admitted it was a stud.

This just shows that players will absolutely try get away with it, and I can't understand how any referee will not visually check all players.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
Level 5 Referee
We have a clear divide: higher levels there’s a ceremonial kit check outside the changing rooms before we lead them on to the field.

At lower levels we take a look around before kick off. Common sense approach is if I see lots if bling on the sidelines while we are waiting I will be proactive, and if I see anything silly in the warm up then everyone gets a quick shout.

Still trying to understand if there is somewhere where it is normal for the ref to address both teams standing around the centre circle - because @GraemeS surely this is something most of us would advise a beginner ref against doing…?
Where are you getting that from? I can't see a single person in this thread suggesting that - so yes, I would advise a beginner ref against that, in the same way I would suggest a beginner ref avoid doing any number of things no one else thinks they should do!

It is mandatory to do a check - and it's advisable to make sure that check is thorough, as it's much better for your match control to tell a player to sort something pre-match than spot it mid-match and have to send them to the side until the next stoppage to correct it. So do what is necessary to be comfortable that you've given yourself every chance of avoiding issues. If you're comfortable doing that with a wander and a glance then sure, if not then take a more active approach and talk to the players and/or go round them while they're warming up.

None of which involves arranging players around the centre circle to give them a grand address...
 

Ben448844

RefChat Addict
Level 4 Referee
At every step 7/6+ game I've ever done, an AR has been expected to loiter around outside changing rooms and check - and that's not considered overly-officious?

If everyone advocating against checks is happy to put their own necks on the line at grassroots then fair enough, but I don't think that's the advice we should be handing out in the "New Referee" forum. It is part of the job you're being paid for to do some kind of kit check - even if that is just standing nearby while a team is stretching and casting an eye over them.

Ideally you just pop in and have a quick word while they're stretching, but if you can't manage that, current laws expect you to do something more proactive than just assuming they're ok and correcting issues as they come up, even if I agree with @Max2 that this would be a much more sensible approach.

I am not referring to step 7 and above where its set in stone what to do. I'm talking park football, kids football etc.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
Level 5 Referee
I am not referring to step 7 and above where its set in stone what to do. I'm talking park football, kids football etc.
You're still obliged to do a check.

And again, people are stretching things past their logical extreme and then dismissing the absurd examples. Why would you take a group of players stood in a circle stretching and make them line up? Go round the existing circle, or step into the middle to briefly ask them to make sure they remove any jewellery etc. If you can't catch them in a circle and KO is approaching, ask the manager/captain to call them in and then do a quick check.

Perhaps I can summarise it like this: No, I don't advise you doing something stupid. Yes, I advise you to do what the law requires you to do.
 
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