RefSix

Preventing keeper from releasing ball

CO. DOWN REF

Well-Known Member
#1
Would you always caution a player for stopping keeper from kicking ball from their hands?
I gave a player 2nd yellow for it yesterday but does in retrospect seem like a soft sending off, although I had previously warned against doing it after an earlier attempt.
 

Jacko

RefChat Addict
#2
Yes if he wants to be an idiot and prevent the keeper releasing the ball its a caution.

I like to shout let the keeper play if a striker looks like he's going to attempt it.
 
#3
No, I've never cautioned a player for this. In fact the only caution I have ever seen for this was in the Manchester derby earlier this season.

IMO there is no need for a caution for this, and the LOTG don't specify if there should be.
 

haywain

the voice of reason
Level 7 Referee
#4
No, I've never cautioned a player for this. In fact the only caution I have ever seen for this was in the Manchester derby earlier this season.

IMO there is no need for a caution for this, and the LOTG don't specify if there should be.
unless, of course, the player kicks or attempts to kick the ball as the goalkeeper is releasing it

which the referee presumably felt that Smalling had done, rightly or wrongly

 

CO. DOWN REF

Well-Known Member
#5
On a cold, wet and windy day in belfast with driving rain (so bad I came close to abandoning due to effect on pitch) shouting to him to move was not an option. Second problem was he was pushing it the whole game - could possibly have sold moving on otherwise. Interestingly the North American referee advice I've seen online calls this situation a mandatory caution for USB.
 
#7
I don't see why people seem to think it's a mandatory caution.

Usually a keeper releasing the ball becomes a 50-50 ball in the middle of the park. So there's hardly a tactical advantage in doing so (sure, he can't kick it quite as far off the ground, but that's about it). FIFA certainly don't expect a mandatory caution here otherwise they'd say so.

I just can't see how a caution is always required here.

In the OP, you already warned the player about it so he kind of had it coming really.

I'm not saying it can't be a caution - especially if there's a foot involved, or it's preventing a quick counter. But just normal blocking - heck, half the time it seems to just be ignorance of the law more than anything else.

Given it's a pretty blatant offence though, I'd find it hard to pass on a caution if the same player does (not necessarily just attempts) it twice
 

Jacko

RefChat Addict
#8
Yeah the laws don't make it mantory but your stopping something from a nothing situation which means it is something.

So to me that's a caution.
 

DaveMac

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
#9
If he'd been pushing you all game then bingo perfect chance to whip out a yellow. Plus everyone sees that yellow and wont try it themselves, unless they are really dumb.

Already booked I wouldnt be whipping another and red though. But I am aware thats a whole lot of double standard refereeing!
 

Padfoot

The Persecuted One
#11
If an opponent raises a foot or leg in an attempt to stop the kick from hands its a caution every single time.......if they just jump and use their body.....stern warning first time, caution if they do it again.
 
#13
If an opponent raises a foot or leg in an attempt to stop the kick from hands its a caution every single time.......if they just jump and use their body.....stern warning first time, caution if they do it again.
Agree, this is a good rule of thumb in the usual run of the game. And then if it's clearly being done to prevent a quick release from the keeper turning into a promising attack, that's also a caution for me
 

McTavish

Well-Known Member
#16
Because of the LOTG:
- A player must be penalised for playing in a dangerous manner if he kicks or attempts to kick the ball when the goalkeeper is in the process of releasing it.
- If a player plays in a dangerous manner in a “normal” challenge, the referee should not take any disciplinary action. If the action is made with obvious risk of injury, the referee should caution the player.

I think that for the most part getting in the way of a keeper trying to kick the ball has an obvious risk of injury for both players so should almost always be a caution.
 
#17
Because of the LOTG:
- A player must be penalised for playing in a dangerous manner if he kicks or attempts to kick the ball when the goalkeeper is in the process of releasing it.
- If a player plays in a dangerous manner in a “normal” challenge, the referee should not take any disciplinary action. If the action is made with obvious risk of injury, the referee should caution the player.

I think that for the most part getting in the way of a keeper trying to kick the ball has an obvious risk of injury for both players so should almost always be a caution.
Any time I have seen a player kick attempt to the ball as it's released by GK there has been no injury so not sure that qualifies as an obvious risk.

The original "why" that I asked was related to a player raising a foot/leg to block a kick out which is also completely different from a player trying to kick the ball as it's being released!
 

McTavish

Well-Known Member
#18
Any time I have seen a player kick attempt to the ball as it's released by GK there has been no injury so not sure that qualifies as an obvious risk.

The original "why" that I asked was related to a player raising a foot/leg to block a kick out which is also completely different from a player trying to kick the ball as it's being released!
I would have thought that the danger that the keeper would kick the blocking player and hurt either one of them is fairly clear.

If you are talking about a player raising a foot when the goalkeeper is kicking it from his hands then this is exactly what this law is about. If you are talking about a keeper kicking a ball on the ground than this is exactly the same as any other player.
 
#19
Raising the leg can mean 2 things

1)if the leg is anywhere in the vicinity of the keeper's legs then it's inherently dangerous. Definite caution

2)a leg can be raised far enough in front of the keeper that there's no inherent risk. This isn't necessarily a caution.
 
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