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throw in delivery question

pankaye

Well-Known Member
Level 6 Referee
I saw this question posted on an American referee Facebook group. There has been a lot of to-ing and fro-ing in response. May I know what peoples thoughts are on this


"So the thrower lifts a back foot in follow-through. It is called a foul throw. However usually it has left their hands and crossed the line before the foot is lifted. Therefore the throw is actually legal? I honestly don't know. By the letter of the law the throw is legal as both feet were down when the ball left their hands. What does everyone else do?"
 
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one

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
This is like asking how many seconds after the keeper has held the ball in their hand do you blow the whistle for a free kick? The law is clear but you are never going to get everyone to agree.

To answer your question, I take it we are not talking U6, then the way I saw it, the foot was up when the ball was delivered. I give the TI to the other side, and hopefully everyone would see this and won't do it again.
 

pankaye

Well-Known Member
Level 6 Referee
This is like asking how many seconds after the keeper has held the ball in their hand do you blow the whistle for a free kick? The law is clear but you are never going to get everyone to agree.

To answer your question, I take it we are not talking U6, then the way I saw it, the foot was up when the ball was delivered. I give the TI to the other side, and hopefully everyone would see this and won't do it again.
I've always understood "the moment of delivering the ball" (as per Procedure at Law 15) to the moment the ball
1. leaves the hands

and/or

2. it crosses the boundary line

But some of the guys on the Facebook post seemed to be implying "delivering" in this case as being different "releasing" (i.e. both feet have to be on the ground throughout the whole procedure even beyond the release of ball) and IMHO overcomplicating a relatively simple aspect of Law 15
 

ChasObserverRefDeveloper

Regular Contributor
I've always understood "the moment of delivering the ball" (as per Procedure at Law 15) to the moment the ball
1. leaves the hands

and/or

2. it crosses the boundary line

But some of the guys on the Facebook post seemed to be implying "delivering" in this case as being different "releasing" (i.e. both feet have to be on the ground throughout the whole procedure even beyond the release of ball) and IMHO overcomplicating a relatively simple aspect of Law 15
Some people do try to over-complicate aspects of law unnecessarily . . . ;)
 

socal lurker

RefChat Addict
I've always understood "the moment of delivering the ball" (as per Procedure at Law 15) to the moment the ball
1. leaves the hands

and/or

2. it crosses the boundary line

But some of the guys on the Facebook post seemed to be implying "delivering" in this case as being different "releasing" (i.e. both feet have to be on the ground throughout the whole procedure even beyond the release of ball) and IMHO overcomplicating a relatively simple aspect of Law 15
Agree they are over complicating. I don’t recall if the image is still in the training, but AYSO had a piece it used in training to emphasize the timing element of when the ball is released. In my experience, it tends to be new refs who want to call this—“ooh, I know that one! Tweet!”—and they over all TI infractions that are either nonexistent or trifling.
 
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