RefSix

Something to look for

Yampy

RefChat Addict
#1
I've no feelings either way on this but as teams adapt to the revised laws, we match officials will have to adapt, too.

Keep a close eye on these types of setup at defensive walls in the early part of the season and more weird and wonderful copycat attempts.


There was also something similar employed by the USA in their game versus Thailand, too.

Also, as infringing this law amendment draws an IDFK to the defending team, might we see walls being formed much further up the pitch? For example, a defensive wall for an IDFK following an offside offence nearer the opponents penalty area? Risky but some someone is sure to dumb enough to get involved.
 
#2
For example, a defensive wall for an IDFK following an offside offence nearer the opponents penalty area?
That would make no sense. You'd just be stranding a minimum of three players (the number required for the new law to come into effect) way upfield for no good reason.
Risky but some someone is sure to dumb enough to get involved.
I doubt it. They'd just leave the three or more players there, way out of position and ignore them as they kick the ball past or over them. It's not difficult to kick the ball over a wall, just to get it to come down quickly enough if you're going for goal (which you wouldn't be doing from that position).
 
Likes: JH

RefJef

RefChat Addict
#3
Quite hard to tell from that clip, but the Spanish “wall” moved before the kick was played (they moved as the kicker ran to the ball) - I’m not sure that one of the Spanish wall wasn’t then within 1m of the yellow wall when the ball was played, thus committing an offence.

Just something else to watch out for!!
 

Yampy

RefChat Addict
#4
That would make no sense. You'd just be stranding a minimum of three players (the number required for the new law to come into effect) way upfield for no good reason.
I doubt it. They'd just leave the three or more players there, way out of position and ignore them as they kick the ball past or over them. It's not difficult to kick the ball over a wall, just to get it to come down quickly enough if you're going for goal (which you wouldn't be doing from that position).
I doubt it too but it will pay to be on your toes at any free kick, wherever it may be on the pitch.
 

Yampy

RefChat Addict
#5
The point I'm making is that this law change will encourage some teams to find some strange ways of circumnavigating. Be alert until everything settles down a bit.
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#6
Quite hard to tell from that clip, but the Spanish “wall” moved before the kick was played (they moved as the kicker ran to the ball) - I’m not sure that one of the Spanish wall wasn’t then within 1m of the yellow wall when the ball was played, thus committing an offence.

Just something else to watch out for!!
I think if they are moving then it can no longer be considered a wall (seeing as walls are solid, in most cases, unmovable structures; yes I know walls can't jump too, anyway I digress...) and secondly if they are moving were they not then failing to retreat the required distance? As opposed to a within 1m offence?
 
#7
@JamesL The Spanish team is the red team. @RefJef was saying that the Spanish players moved within 1m of the defensive wall.


Quite hard to tell from that clip, but the Spanish “wall” moved before the kick was played (they moved as the kicker ran to the ball) - I’m not sure that one of the Spanish wall wasn’t then within 1m of the yellow wall when the ball was played, thus committing an offence.

Just something else to watch out for!!

I believe, just like the 6 second rule, you shouldn't be too harsh with these situations. As long as no attacker is touching the defensive wall, just play on.
 

Goldfish

Well-Known Member
#9
Hi
The intent of the amended law is to prevent shenanigans in the wall, the usual pushing and shoving etc. if the attacking teams sets up a wall in front of the wall so be it. As long as they do not get involved in the opponents wall refs should be none too bothered if there is movement at or around the moment of the kick.
sure if the defensive wall comes forward it is encroachment and a retake and if the attacking team get involved in the defensive wall before the kick it is an idfk.
I can't really see this tactic of an attacking wall be used extensively. It has been tried in the past to hide the ball direction and not worked.
What players tried to do in the past was push the two end players in the wall or create a gap in the wall through pushing opponents. Also attackers wanted to position themselves in such a way that prevented defenders from being in that position That can't happen any longer
 
#10
I was AR on a game the other day with good U20s and one team put a guy a yard in front of his own corner taker. Worked very well. Keeper saw things late. They got two goals out of it.

I agree with the the thrust of this thread. The new law will mean all kinds of experimenting and unexpected results that we should be on the lookout for.
 

JH

RefChat Addict
#11
"That's one way to get around the new rules!" - except it isn't...

New laws are to avoid attackers physically disrupting the defensive wall. Did they physically disrupt the defensive wall? No.

All they did was reduce the distance for their player to get the ball up and over, making it harder for themselves:wall:
 

QuaverRef

I used to be indecisive but now i'm not so sure
#12
The point I'm making is that this law change will encourage some teams to find some strange ways of circumnavigating. Be alert until everything settles down a bit.
It’s not really circumventing, it’s abiding by.

Infact, they could have done this even before the law change so I’m not really sure what the discussion point is here
 
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