Ref position without Assistant Referee

#1
Hi all, I am hoping to get clarification on the positions a referees should take when there are no Assistant referees. I am being assessed soon nd don't want to be marked down on positioning. During the game I try to run the diagonal as much as possible however not always possible due to the flow of the game, so I tend to stay roughly 15 yards away from the ball. Corners, I normally take up a position at the back post, in line with the goal area line, reason being ball crossing the line is my highest priority. I've read a number of times you should change position but I'm not 100% sure on this. Free kicks from just outside the box where a defending wall has been setup, offside and goal crosiing the goal lines are my in these situations are my main concerns, so i tend to position myself on the opposite side of the field from where the freekick is being tsken, and in line with the last defender. My main worry from this position is what if the ball strikes the arm of one of the defenders in the wall, wall is inside the penalty area, i shoukd be giving a penalty but i cant see this as i could be 20/30 yards away. Thanks everyone for your help.
 

CA

Well-Known Member
#2
For the positioning in your assessments, the assessor generally just wants to see you take up various positions. Rather than consistently taking up the same position for corner kicks (behind the rear post), change it around, make your starting position different each corner. Once the corner has been taken, move to an area of the penalty box which you haven't yet been to during the last corner. Positioning is subjective, each assessor has their own opinions on where they like referees to stand.

During open play, you have the right idea, try to have proactive movement rather than reactive movement. Move to where you think the ball will be played, this will help you in the fitness area, as you won't be having to play catch-up for the whole match. 15 yards away from play throughout the entire match would be acceptable. However, try to make sure you penetrate each penalty area, especially in the later stages of the game. It shows the assessor you are still working hard and managing to chase the balls down into an area, which could cause the most damage to your match control, is something were to be missed.

For free kicks, use the same mentality as for the corner kicks. Whilst generally I would stand in a similar position to the one you have described, change your positioning once in a while to show the assessor you can take up a variation of different positions. However, try not to let this compromise your performance, as if you are too focussed on taking up a different position, you may well miss something which would cause you to be marked down from a different area.

I am assuming you are a level 7 (or equivalent thereof depending on your nationality), as you are [generally] only assessed 3 times out of the 20 games you have to complete, you have to do this to show the assessor what you're capable of. Such a small number of games are assessed that unless you change your game slightly to show the assessor the wide variety of skills you have, each assessment will generally be lower. I am not saying change everything about the way you referee, just try to show a more diverse range of positions when being assessed.

Best wishes for your first assessment.
 

Yampy

Well-Known Member
#3
My main worry from this position is what if the ball strikes the arm of one of the defenders in the wall, wall is inside the penalty area, i shoukd be giving a penalty but i cant see this as i could be 20/30 yards away. Thanks everyone for your help.
When you set up the wall, you know it is either inside the PA or out. (A tip I was given recently - never set up a wall on the line of the PA. Always make sure it is clearly inside or out even if it means the wall is more than/less than 10yards away.) Make sure both teams know this, too. If you deem the handball is deliberate then you already know where the wall is and can therefore give the decision without too much concern.
 
#4
Great advice David and CA I appreciate it. Especially penetrating the penalty area in the closing later stages of the game and not setting up the wall on the penalty area line.
 
#8
3 assessments in NI - who are you bribing? Haven't had one in 3 years.
That was my first assessment, it went well and the Assessor did pick up on my positioning at corners and around the penalty area. Something I need to work on I guess.
If you want to be assessed more often in N.I try to get on the regional development group and go to the monthly meetings, this has have helped me to develop as a ref.
 

CO. DOWN REF

Well-Known Member
#9
Can't be bothered with the politics, the irrelevance, the nonsense and the ass kissing involved in a NEURA meeting / regional groups etc.
Most of the assessors haven't a clue anyway.
 
#10
Amen to that. It's funny how we still talk about diagonals when without AR's, the diagonal is pointless.
Corners - without AR's I will virtually always stand off the goal line, between the kicker and the goal, around the edge of the GA. A close ball in/out of goal is the most important decision that can happen, and that's the only position that lets me see it. This position is only a problem if the ball drops to the far side, then my view is a bit obstructed - but positioning is all about playing the odds and what's more important. Sacrifice one way to gain somewhere else. Sure, it also means I'm behind on a fast break, but half the time they get held up in midfield anyway, or a foul is so blatant you can see it from 3 fields away, so rarely a problem. I'll sacrifice 'changing my position' to take up that option. And the Assessor should NOT be marking you down for these choices.

Free kicks, I'll probably get in line for offside, probably more on the near side.

General play? Anything can happen. Really depends on the game. I've had games where I've basically hung out with one team's sweeper all game - because there was a lot of potential offside activity up that end and almost no fouls. That's unusual, but it's worked. The fact that I have to pick up offside and ball in/out of play will change my positioning, and sometimes that will mean I'll miss something else that happens - but you can't get everything right with positioning. Really be proactive and adapt to the game. Assessor's like to see you change positions at dead ball restarts, and 'get wide' (personally, I think assessors are unreasonably obsessed with this - getting wide is probably more beneficial without an AR than with one!).
 

santa sangria

Well-Known Member
#11
When you set up the wall, you know it is either inside the PA or out. (A tip I was given recently - never set up a wall on the line of the PA. Always make sure it is clearly inside or out even if it means the wall is more than/less than 10yards away.) Make sure both teams know this, too. If you deem the handball is deliberate then you already know where the wall is and can therefore give the decision without too much concern.
Brilliant - I have used this 5 times this week already!
More tips like this please;)

When reviewed I was specifically told by my FA to practice the diagonal in non-AR games. Of course in the review game, before that advice, I had no ARs, very low sun at the half way, and two high lines, so I patrolled the touchline looking for offsides with my back to the sun - d'oh!

But now, knowing that instruction, I find using the diagonal with no ARs works well. In a fast game on a full sized pitch there has to be compromise. So I am happy if I have some distance to the corners where my ARs would be. If I get a throw in wrong "sorry, my assistant would have seen that, get promoted, get linesman, you deserve it" etc etc. With a wide diagonal and getting close to the defensive line, especially on long free kicks I feel in control. Of course some variation is required with corners and free kicks but standing on the goal line is too much IMHO. With no diagonal and improvising positions all the time it is too random IMHO.
 

OIREF!

Well-Known Member
#12
Amen to that. It's funny how we still talk about diagonals when without AR's, the diagonal is pointless.
Well said CapnBloodbeard. Without ARs the diagonal just doesn't work for me, seem to spend most of the time running towards the centre of the pitch. Personally I prefer to move in a v-shape between corner flags and centre circle on one side of the pitch. I find it easier and quicker to get into wide positions. This works for me but any assessor will be looking for dagonal, thankfully my days of being assessed are well behind me now.