credibility of decisions

micky2001

Well-Known Member
Level 5 Referee
#1
I was wondering if there were any boundaries used for the areas assistants can be seen to have "credible" decisions with. For example, if one AR is on the half way line and a decision happens up the other end of the park, apparently out of view if the other AR and referee although they are closer, should he get involved?

My only worry is if the referee was to have seen it and felt I wasn't worthy of a free kick and I've flagged from a much farther distance to give it.

Anyone got advice in situations like this?
 

Brian Hamilton

I am the storm
Observer/Tutor
#2
Imagine the assistant is the centre of a bubble with a 15m radius. Inside that radius if the referee has a clear line of sight to the incident, the assistant should come in as close to simultaneously with the referee's whistle (unless the referee has already denied the incident or signalled that advantage is being played). If the referee has no line of sight, then the assistant can signal before the referee. Beyond the 15m distance, the referee has to be a lot further away than 15m otherwise the intervention just undermines the referee.
 

lincs22

Supply League Observer
Staff member
Observer/Tutor
#3
Imagine the assistant is the centre of a bubble with a 15m radius. Inside that radius if the referee has a clear line of sight to the incident, the assistant should come in as close to simultaneously with the referee's whistle (unless the referee has already denied the incident or signalled that advantage is being played). If the referee has no line of sight, then the assistant can signal before the referee. Beyond the 15m distance, the referee has to be a lot further away than 15m otherwise the intervention just undermines the referee.
Brian, I would have gone for 20 yards myself, but we are in the same scope. Getting outside that area, you become less credible but you can still give if the referee's position is even less credible - a long breakaway and a challenge on the edge of the PA. Referee awards free-kick but you can guide as to whether Pen or DFK.

I was wondering if there were any boundaries used for the areas assistants can be seen to have "credible" decisions with. For example, if one AR is on the half way line and a decision happens up the other end of the park, apparently out of view if the other AR and referee although they are closer, should he get involved?

My only worry is if the referee was to have seen it and felt I wasn't worthy of a free kick and I've flagged from a much farther distance to give it.

Anyone got advice in situations like this?
From distance like you describe, you should only be flagging for VC. If seen, there can be no limit on credibility.
 

Jacko

Well-Known Member
#4
@Brian Hamilton @lincs22

Do you have any advice on pre-match instructions to give to NARs?

I have had NARs that have recently given freekicks which I didn't want as referee because I was happy with the challenge or they were very soft in a dangerous area, which undermined my credibility and also nearly had an affect on my match control.
 

AlexF

Well-Known Member
#5
The only advice I can give on that is advice I've received myself from national level referees in higher level competitive games here:

For the first 5-15 minutes of the match, try to read my [the referee's] foul tolerance levels. If there's something that obviously exceeds it that I've not seen, signal for it. Otherwise, try to let things flow a bit, and let me take the blame for things.​

Do note that for that first period of time, that game official tirelessly covered about 80% of the field, so that he was never more than about 15 yards from any play. After that time passed, and we were all obviously on the same page for tolerance levels, he moved much closer to a standard diagonal.

Once you begin working with someone on a more regular basis, then you can gauge their levels fairly rapidly. In fact, I did a game with that same referee later in the season (a knock-out match) and because the three of us (Ref and 2ARs) had worked two other games together as a team over the last few weeks, his pre-game advice became "You guys know my tolerance levels for this level of competition. Let's call things a bit tighter than normal for the first 10 minutes to set the tone, then we'll let them play. As usual, follow my lead."
 

Brian Hamilton

I am the storm
Observer/Tutor
#7
@AlexF That might work with some, but it is very loose, and not direct enough imo for the majority. It could lead to the odd curve ball.
@Jacko My advice would be the same. The alternative is to tell them not to come in on anything for the 1st 15 minutes, if you are within 20 yards and looking at the contact. The danger with that approach is that you need their help and they don't step up. It also risks getting the backs up of any capable assistants.
 

lincs22

Supply League Observer
Staff member
Observer/Tutor
#8
@Jacko - another way of phasing the PMI.

Take a lead from what I am giving and allowing, so I would like you to flag for what I have missed not what you have seen.

This emphases they should not give a flag because they would, but to act as your assistants and aid your match control by what you have missed either because it is blind-side or they are more credibly positioned.
 

Jacko

Well-Known Member
#9
@Brian Hamilton Yeah I understand it might get their backs up but I think it might be needed. I'm lucky I wasn't assessed the other day, I know I had a challenging game but the two assistants who were very wet behind the ears made it more challenging for me and themselves than it needed to be.

I've been told to think about my pre-match. Not to flag unless I make direct eye contact for something we are both looking at. Then not look at them if I'm confident its not a foul and also makes them think a bit more and more hesitant to come in when I don't want it.

@lincs22 I already use that line. But didn't seem to work last weekend.
 

lincs22

Supply League Observer
Staff member
Observer/Tutor
#10
@Brian Hamilton Yeah I understand it might get their backs up but I think it might be needed. I'm lucky I wasn't assessed the other day, I know I had a challenging game but the two assistants who were very wet behind the ears made it more challenging for me and themselves than it needed to be.

I've been told to think about my pre-match. Not to flag unless I make direct eye contact for something we are both looking at. Then not look at them if I'm confident its not a foul and also makes them think a bit more and more hesitant to come in when I don't want it.

@lincs22 I already use that line. But didn't seem to work last weekend.
Go for the David Elleray route,

Just ball in and out today, look at me for direction......