RefSix

Cards and how to use them

Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#21
I agree with Padfoot on his point about "keeping them guessing." I suppose it doesn't really add anything to your ability to control the game.

Also, what Tealeaf said is a great point and one that I implemented in October after refereeing alongside a National-level referee who gave me that little trick. It is really helpful and much tidier.
 
#22
I tend to talk about the offence and why I've called them over, take the name and then reach for the card. That little bit of extra time to think while I'm talking/writing can be useful if it's one I'm in two minds about.
 
#23
I'm relatively new in terms of being qualified, although been ref-ing games for 4 seasons now, when i was taught it was all about trying to diffuse the situation before the caution. it enables the offending player to collect their thoughts and perhaps take in what has happend.

It's only when the kick off or feel hard done to that the hard line comes out, otherwise you've lost control there on.

Bit worried about the remarks centred around "keeping players guessing"......

If i am going to caution a player, then it is one of the first things i say to a player....that way you may diffuse any potential tension where the player is unsure of what he is going to get etc. Also, if you have a player who is approaching you clearly wound up and in danger of talking/acting themselves into a harsher sanction, it gives you an opportunity to calm them down.....

Of course there will always be the numpty who is hell bent on having a pop.....then they deserve everything they get. But we don't have to increase the tension by trying to be clever over what colour card to show.
 

refdave83

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
#24
Total agree with the comments about disagreeing with the "keep them guessing" attitude.

This season I was ref in an u14 game. A goal mouth mealy happened. About 8-10 players in 6yrd box. I was just inside the 18yrd box and could not see the ball due to the amount of players in the box. A striker claimed a HB on the line by a defender. I had no idea. As he ran past me, clearly frustrated, he called me a cheat!! I said in a loud voice I will talk to you in a minute. About a minute or so later the ball went OOP. I called him over and explained why. I explained I could easily send him off for what he said. I told me why I didn't see it and I told him I was going to book him for decent. He begged me not to book him. I told me "take your pick red or yellow". He took a booking. At HT I explained to the manager what had happened. I did not here a thing out of him for the rest of the game.

I spoke to our referee coach afterwards and he said I managed the situation well.
 
#29
I picked up a trick from when I watched Chris Foy at the Stadium of Light (Just the first one I saw do it) that he dips straight into his pocket and pulls out a yellow card. This immediately lets the players know what is coming (which generally works for me, I've never experienced a problem with this method) and this stops me from changing my mind which I used to do before hand..
 

Ian Mitchell

Active Member
Level 5 Referee
#30
I don't like showing players the colour of the cards early, just in case I change my mind. I use the wallet with each card either side, easily accessible in shorts pocket. Players know they're in trouble if you get your book out! There is a time and a place for an instant card (usually a red to stop a mass punch up from starting but I've done it a couple of times for a yellow, for delaying restarts normally) but for run of the mill cautions it's better to talk to players, slow the game down and show them the card after the name's in the book. Anyway, refereeing is about managing the game for the players, not dishing out cards.
 
A

Arran Williams

Guest
#31
definitely the use of taking a red and yellow out at the same time, including your note pad helps but use it sparingly during a game.
talk to players and try manage them as i've found thats what they look for at higher levels but don't try manage a definite caution or red card.
 
#32
I agree with you Ian. 8/10 times I caution people for dissent. The way in which I caution a player is normally determined on the players attitude and the mood of the game. For most dissents and for reckless tackles I normally dive straight in my pocket and pull the yellow card out. (Mainly because) I find this stops me from changing my mind as I pity the player and decide to have a word instead, and I have found (sometimes) it defuses some situations as players automatically assume that after a reckless tackle or swearing/dissent a red card is coming, so sometimes it stops unnecessary aggro from players. However in some instances I talk to the player first before dipping into my pocket and try and calm the player down.
 

Aled

RefChat Addict
Level 5 Referee
#33
My trick is to clearly explain to the player WHY i am booking/sending off after taking their name, works 9/10 times until you get a gobby sod who thinks he knows the LotG word for word!
 

ref craig

RefChat Addict
#34
I keep my cards separate my yellow is in my shorts right pocket and my red in my middle pocket I always keep 2 of everything so I've also got 2 pens just in case I lose one but however if I reach into my middle pocket expect fireworks but I do tend to try and give warnings before a yellow unless it needs a yellow or a red
 

ref craig

RefChat Addict
#35
to all experienced referees as well as my cards I can pick out my pocket I have fifa red yellow cards in a book in like I would like to use them to diffuse a situation to take time to think my decision over and if I need to give out a yellow after talking to a player so if anyone give me advice to this question then that would be nice lol
 

Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#36
I don't like showing players the colour of the cards early, just in case I change my mind. I use the wallet with each card either side, easily accessible in shorts pocket. Players know they're in trouble if you get your book out! There is a time and a place for an instant card (usually a red to stop a mass punch up from starting but I've done it a couple of times for a yellow, for delaying restarts normally) but for run of the mill cautions it's better to talk to players, slow the game down and show them the card after the name's in the book. Anyway, refereeing is about managing the game for the players, not dishing out cards.
I don't really see why changing your mind is a consideration; by the time that I've called him over, I've decided already: yellow or red, and I'm ready to tell him "That's a cynical tackle, you're off for that" or "You need to be more careful, that's a very reckless challenge -- you're being booked." I can't see what, after the incident, I would change my mind about. That said, he could earn him self two -- one for the incident, another for dissent afterwards.
 

Roo

New Member
#37
Book with two yellows in shirt pocket, yellow in left short pocket, red in right and back pocket.... Right on cards really aren't the best thing at parks level, especially if you dont have teamsheets
 

MattyL7

Member
Level 7 Referee
#40
Wow that sounds like it makes your job a lot harder.

I observed a referee a couple of weeks ago, (on a Sunday div 4 game), they had to give teamsheets, with correct numbers

Does it differ by county?
 
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