RefSix

Blowing whistle on free kicks

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#21
Me too. A simple expression of this is that the only right a team committing a foul has is the right for the referee not to confuse them.

If you do something that would reasonably make them think the FK has become ceremonial, it needs to be ceremonial.

I strongly disagree with the idea of automatically making all attacking third FKs ceremonial. If the team wants to take a quick FK, that is their right.
Agree completely.

The only thing I'd add is that a quick free kick does have to be exactly that - quick. There's no such thing as a long non-ceremonial FK, there comes a point where (in attacking positions at least), the defence has a right to expect a whistle to restart.
 

Ben448844

RefChat Addict
#22
Another top about the final whistle - if the balls been hoofed off the pitch for a goal kick or throw, wait for someone to collect it, take the goal kick/throw etc before you blow, otherwise no one will fetch the ball.

Perhaps not your problem at full time, but home team manager will thank you, perhaps more pertinent at half time, that way you’ve got the ball back ready for the start of the second half.
Excellent tip. I've ever blown up when I've seen a defender running back towards the corner flag and about to clear it into the river (for the 5th time).

Agreed re dont blow up straight after a goal l. Unless it's 8-0, then just blow up :)
 
#23
The only thing I'd add is that a quick free kick does have to be exactly that - quick. There's no such thing as a long non-ceremonial FK, there comes a point where (in attacking positions at least), the defence has a right to expect a whistle to restart.
I don't quite agree with this. A whistle is not required for a FK--unless something happens to make it required. The passage of time is not one of those things. I do agree that most slow kicks will become ceremonial for one reason or another. And I agree that the referee always has the authority to direct teams to wait on the whistle. And where it is apparent from behavior that botth teams expect it, stepping in can be the best course of action, going back to the "no surprises" concept. But I disagree that the passage of time ever gives the opposing team the right to expect a whistle. (And we all have to manage within local expectations as well.)
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
#24
Old advice was to have the KO, both to not look like time had expired before the goal was scored and to ensure opportunity to solve any problems (i.e. an AR telling you a reason the goal could not stand)--as it used to be that you could not change a decision after blowing for full time.

Tweaks in practice about time keeping (with added time being more visible) and in the laws (can change a decision if haven't left the field) makes that a bit obsolete. IMHO, the key is not to rush it--make sure you make eye contact with ARs (if you have them), be sure there is nothing that you need to address before, and go ahead and call it. YMMV.
It isn't just that, but also the message you are sending out. In not restarting you are either saying that time was already up when the goal was scored, or it was scored at the very second the clock hit full time, and if clubs work this out you are likely to get trouble. Whereas if you kick off and play another 30 seconds there is no grounds for argument.
 
Top