RefSix

ball inspection

#1
How does everyone inspect the match ball/s, I at the minute do the bounce test and that failed the other week as it seemed fine but after about 10 minutes the players started to complain the ball was rock hard, so it had to be changed , i have now ordered a ball pressure gauge
 

SM

The avuncular one
#2
I do a check for bits of peeling leather, squeeze and bounce. If it has any loose leather whatsoever it cold cause a serious eye injury so will not be allowed. Other than that as long as it is pumped up and bounces as it should, it is all systems go!

Be careful with the pressure gauge. Heard of a ref who damaged a ball trying to use one.... Didn't go down well!
 

drahc

Well-Known Member
Observer/Tutor
#3
I used a ball pressure guage. Managers seemed impressed when they see it - first impressions and everything!

I use to use the bounce and squeeze option, but the ball pressure guage is so much better!
 

refdave83

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
#6
Always use one.

I was given a couples of balls for my game yesterday did the bounce and press check - felt fine. Got back into changing room used pressure gauge both slightly under.

always use one just to be sure - only takes a few seconds
 

Gaz

New Member
Level 7 Referee
#7
look (no bits hanging off, leather intact, round)
feel and squeeze (little bit of give between the fingers and thumb)
bounce and do a few kick ups (if it hurts my toe, let some air out)

good to go!
 
#8
look (no bits hanging off, leather intact, round)
feel and squeeze (little bit of give between the fingers and thumb)
bounce and do a few kick ups (if it hurts my toe, let some air out)

good to go!
Really? Around here I'd expect to be crucified if I was being assessed and failed to check with a pressure gauge. Also, it prevents any complaints from the players as inevitably there's somebody who thinks the ball is too hard or too soft.

And yeah check for frayed seams etc, do the spin test for sphericity, and check that they are the balls specified for the competition (where applicable).
 
#13
Great illustration of the difference a pressure gauge makes today, especially if you're using multiple balls. We got the 5 match balls, all felt pretty much the same, all about right. Got the pressure gauge out, and they ranged from 6 - 10 psi (the laws require 8.5 - 15.6).
 

Gaz

New Member
Level 7 Referee
#14
Really? Around here I'd expect to be crucified if I was being assessed and failed to check with a pressure gauge. Also, it prevents any complaints from the players as inevitably there's somebody who thinks the ball is too hard or too soft.

And yeah check for frayed seams etc, do the spin test for sphericity, and check that they are the balls specified for the competition (where applicable).
Perhaps a little tongue in cheek, but yeah you can't argue with a pressure gauge. If you've got one, use it and be comfortable in the knowledge that your ball is good :)

Pure laziness that means that if it feels okay to play with to me, then in my mind its probably okay to play with! ;) But this is obviously not the correct answer to your question.

As a note of interest, I've never once seen any of the level 4s I've assisted use a pressure gauge, and none of the assessors Ive had have either noticed or commented either way. Perhaps this is a bit more strictly adhered to in the southern hemisphere? As you rise through the levels I imagine it is more important to be barometrically correct?
 

DanCohen17

Simply The Best
#15
All games I do nowadays, a pressure gauge is used. Sometimes by AR, sometimes by ref. But all Supply & Comtrib games I've been on have had a gauge used on the ball!
 
#16
If the Laws of the Game specify what pressure the ball is to be, and you can easily and quickly check this with an inexpensive piece of equipment, why wouldn't you?
 

Ross

Forum VAR
Staff member
#18
Bounce test has always worked for me. I drop it from a height (door) then if it bounces higher than handle of the door, then the ball is fine

Not failed me yet

(should also add, ive had this proven a few times by a pressure gauge afterwards)
 
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