A&H

First Caution

JohnnyRef

New Member
Newly qualified and doing my 5th game this morning, a u12 friendly.

1st half incident free, positioning wasn't great as I seemed to be a magnet for the ball, but the players were quite low-level so it pinging all over the place which didn't help. Just one heavy challenge that I didn't see clearly but no card issued and no one complained. Had a quick word with the defender and it was fine. Reds up 3-0

2nd half also good, Orange team score loads and take the lead.

Now, I've noticed in my previous games I was reluctant to blow for fouls, (confidence and overthinking) and last time out I felt that control got away from me slightly so I went into this one with the mindset of 'if I see it, I'm blowing"

I decided to add on 2 mins at the end. Orange get a DFK just outside the box and score. They'd been slow on the restarts after going in front so I was hurrying them up verbally but it was getting a bit obvious. From the restart ball ends up back with Red gk, who crosses the edge of the box with the ball in his hands when attempting to kick! DFK awarded. I'd told him twice earlier in the game to take care as he was getting very close to the line when kicking out of his hands.

Reds obviously fuming and arguing the toss, but nothing excessive. Ball ends up in the net again from the FK after a bit of a scramble. At this point I'm now over the amount of time I'd added, so I jog back to halfway. Orange are slow coming back again so I ask them to speed up 3 times.

Then I notice an Orange really slow, so I say 'come on, get back in' and he just smirks and me and slows down to a walk.

In the moment I'm convinced this is delaying the restart, but I let him walk back in while I approach to give me some thinking time. I felt he was taking the mick, so yellow card given.

Game restarts and full time within seconds.

I explain to both coaches my rationale for the 2 decisions at the end and both seem fine with it. I'm not putting that card in, it's a learning experience for young players and I probably wouldn't issue that card in a competitive game but I wanted to demonstrate the correct Laws, I just don't think it should cost an 11 year old £12 to learn it.

As I'm driving home I'm second guessing myself though. What I should have done was blow fulltime after the last goal went in because there was no chance Reds could get up the other end to score with the amount of time left.

A parent challenged me about the yellow with it being so close the the end of the game. I said I apply the Laws and the player delayed the restart after multiple warnings, doesn't matter what the clock says.

One thing I'm very happy with is playing advantage on a foul in the box. Gave it just enough time before blowing for it to fall to the CF who took a touch and scored. Overall I'm quite happy, felt a lot more in control of the game than previously
 
A&H International
I'm not putting that card in
I wouldn't advise this. You can be sanctioned if it is found you aren't reporting cards/misconduct etc. I know a ref in my league got a 1 month ban from the league when he got found out. It is not optional, you have to report it. I know that there is a temptation not to in kids friendlies, but once that card has come out it has to be reported.
 
I wouldn't advise this. You can be sanctioned if it is found you aren't reporting cards/misconduct etc. I know a ref in my league got a 1 month ban from the league when he got found out. It is not optional, you have to report it. I know that there is a temptation not to in kids friendlies, but once that card has come out it has to be reported.
Thanks for the tip.
Very common around the leagues locally to not put cards in. For the team I coached the first ones were u14 before they were done properly, and we dod get a few. Noted for the future though.
 
Can’t convince you to report a caution, but Gabriel has correctly pointed out your responsibility to do it, and the penalty carried if not.

That being said, if you want to teach someone a lesson about a caution, do not bring the card out to do it! Talk and explain that something could’ve been a caution if you want to an educate a young player. By actually doing it, you then find yourself in the situation above.

Besides that, sounds like you took some good positives from this.
 
Some good positives to take out here.

Whilst I want to discourage a massive pile on about not reporting the caution there are some really important things to consider.

1) by not reporting the caution you encourage the "don't report it" questions. As an adult (assumed by reference to driving home) please remember the next referee could be a child put in a difficult position by the actions of a previous referee.
2) You say you want to teach the lesson. Education is great, but be careful you are teaching the right things and not accidentally teaching less desirable behaviours.
3) in law 5 if you take disciplinary action it is your duty to report that to the relevant authority: "acts as timekeeper, keeps a record of the match and provides the appropriate authorities with a match report, including information on disciplinary action and any other incidents that occurred before, during or after the match"

In basic terms if you aren't prepared to report the caution after the match then don't show the card. Less forgiving of management of a situation than dereliction of duty.

It's great though that you have identified how we don't end up in that situation in the future. This self reflection will hopefully stand you in good stead moving forwards with your referee career.
 
Good one on the advantage goal.

With warning the goalkeeper earlier about handling outside the box, sounds like you did well here to set up the free kick later.

At the end of the match, again, sounds good. As to your question, should you have blown for full time? Technically, yes… but… if it was the decisive goal, it’s not smart - you will get accused of continuing until the goal. So, a restart, a few seconds, and then the full time whistle presents much better.

Overall, incident by incident, I buy your explanations. However, when you look back, and considering this is u12, have a think about when and how to interfere, who are you really communicating with when you warn a player (is it really a public warning to manage parents and benches, or a private warning to educate a player)…

Good stuff overall;)
 
Thanks for the tip.
Very common around the leagues locally to not put cards in. For the team I coached the first ones were u14 before they were done properly, and we dod get a few. Noted for the future though.
The new system often results in a club contacting the Disciplinary Section if a caution has not arrived, as they wish to know whether the player is available for the next game.
The player knew he was pushing his luck. The club will be fined, and decide whether to pass the fine to the player/parent.
Please report it.
 
The new system often results in a club contacting the Disciplinary Section if a caution has not arrived, as they wish to know whether the player is available for the next game.
The player knew he was pushing his luck. The club will be fined, and decide whether to pass the fine to the player/parent.
Please report it.
Yes, and this has resulted in a lot of referees being charged and suspended. Club contacts the CFA to ask about a caution they received, CFA check and find no such caution, referee is then in hot water.

Don't risk it, it is pretty much a mandatory suspension if you are caught.
 
we got an email from cfa saying 11 v 11 AND 9 v 9 were not ok in June. I assume they know what they are doing. But maybe not.
Another topic, but briefly, it may well be different between counties, but in my CFA the first listed exemption was Small-sided matches, mini-soccer matches or matches played according to “The Laws of the Game – 9 v 9".
 
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