Ref4Me

Quick Free Kicks (Delaying Restarts)

ggroves.2

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Level 7 Referee
Question:

When I award a free kick, it's common I see managers and coaches shouting at their players to stand in front of the ball, and block it.

If they delay the free kick from being taken, is it a cautionable offence for failing to respect the 9.15?

I'm not sure, as it seems to be done to slow the pace down, but some teams like quick free kicks and therefore opposing teams will employ this tactic to stop them.

In addition, if a team takes a quick free kick, before players can retreat 9.15, and then a defender intercepts the free kick, does play continue (from my knowledge if you don't give the player time to retreat, it's on you).

Want this confirmed as I head into early county events and league finals.

All advice appreciated
 
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Bombedcoma

New Member
Level 4 Referee

The referee will allow play to continue as the player took a risk (to gain an advantage) by taking the free kick when an opponent was still within 9.15 m.

Cut and paste.

I got marked down in a 7-6 assessment for not carding a player who did this. So if you let it go and get questioned then you may have to justify it to your assessor.

I guess the question for the quick free quick is 'how quick is quick'?
 

ASM

Moderator
Staff member
Level 3 Referee
There’s a difference between a player actively moving to prevent the free kick, such as running or moving from a distance to within 9.15m to stop a free kick being taken and a player being within the distance and not being able to retreat due to the actions of an attacker taking the kick quickly.

In the first instance, you need to try and manage/deal with it using the tools in your arsenal. Ideally use you voice/body language/whistle to actively be seen to tell the player to move away and let any kick be taken. If needed you then have a yellow card and a “told you so” to fall back on.

In the second instance, play should be allowed to continue, a stated in law.
 
Last edited:

Bombedcoma

New Member
Level 4 Referee
There’s a difference between a player actively moving to prevent the free kick, such as running or moving from a distance to within 9.15m to stop a free kick being taken and a player being within the distance and not being able to retreat due to the actions of an attacker taking the kick quickly.

In the first instance, you need to try and manage/deal with it using the tools in your arsenal. Ideally use you voice/body language/whistle to actively be seen to tell the player to move away and let any kick be taken. If needed you then have a yellow card and a “told you so” to fall back on.

In the second instance, okay should be allowed to continue, a stated in law.
Yes well said! Prevention better than cure
 

one

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
If they delay the free kick from being taken, is it a cautionable offence for failing to respect the 9.15?
If they delay the free kick from being taken then the caution should be for delaying the restart. But your description means the opponent's can still take the free kick so the so those standing in front are not delaying but close the options. This caution would be for not respecting the distance. Be proactive on this. Yell out "move away" before or as soon as they are there. If the team with free kick have not taken it reasonably quickly, indicate it's ceremonial... There are lots of ways to mange this and avoid a caution. But if opponents are not cooperative you should caution.

Delaying the restart is usually when the ball is held on to or thrown/kicked away.

In addition, if a team takes a quick free kick, before players can retreat 9.15, and then a defender intercepts the free kick, does play continue (from my knowledge if you don't give the player time to retreat, it's on you).
Correct but you'd have to be carefully here. If the kick taker kicks it directly at the opponent and the opponent doesn't have to do much to intercept it then all good. But if the opponent takes a step or two sideways to intercept because they see the kick is directed to get it passed them, then a caution it is.
 

socal lurker

RefChat Addict
If a miscreant moves toward the ball and is closer than around 5 yards in order to stop a quick kick and is successful in stopping a quick kick the other team is trying to do, I’m going to card every time. I will typically call “don’t do that“ when a player is starting to move toward the ball. (And if the coach has yelled at a player to stand on the ball, i am much quicker to caution.
 

ggroves.2

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Level 7 Referee

The referee will allow play to continue as the player took a risk (to gain an advantage) by taking the free kick when an opponent was still within 9.15 m.

Cut and paste.

I got marked down in a 7-6 assessment for not carding a player who did this. So if you let it go and get questioned then you may have to justify it to your assessor.

I guess the question for the quick free quick is 'how quick is quick'?
I always see quick as put it straight down, stop it then kick within 3-5 seconds, keeper never asks for a wall, defence never set up ect.
 

ggroves.2

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Level 7 Referee
If a miscreant moves toward the ball and is closer than around 5 yards in order to stop a quick kick and is successful in stopping a quick kick the other team is trying to do, I’m going to card every time. I will typically call “don’t do that“ when a player is starting to move toward the ball. (And if the coach has yelled at a player to stand on the ball, i am much quicker to caution.
Would you say it’s worth mentioning to managers in my pre-match talk?
 

ggroves.2

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Level 7 Referee
Correct but you'd have to be carefully here. If the kick taker kicks it directly at the opponent and the opponent doesn't have to do much to intercept it then all good. But if the opponent takes a step or two sideways to intercept because they see the kick
Thanks. And would that caution be for not respecting the distance?
 

lincs22

Supply League Observer
Staff member
Observer/Tutor
Would you say it’s worth mentioning to managers in my pre-match talk?
Only asking for trouble, when it happens and you don't caution.

You will not find too many coaches nor appealing for this at grassroots level, given they know a caution will follow. If you do find this happening, you can speak to the coach, warn him at subsequent incidents will result in a caution for the player - He knows and the player will be aware.
 

ggroves.2

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Level 7 Referee
Only asking for trouble, when it happens and you don't caution.

You will not find too many coaches nor appealing for this at grassroots level, given they know a caution will follow. If you do find this happening, you can speak to the coach, warn him at subsequent incidents will result in a caution for the player - He knows and the player will be aware.
Much appreciated
 
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