RefSix

Pre-match Player Briefing

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#1
I'm still relatively new on here and I've seen a number of threads discussing how to brief assistants pre-match, and a few others where referees refer to instructions that they give to captains at the coin toss. What I haven't seen is any reference to what I've always done, which is having a quick chat to the team as a whole before the match begins.

Is this a common thing to do, or am I stepping well outside protocol here? And if so, how do you decide when to approach the teams and what do you say once you have them all together?

Personally, as this is so early on in my interactions with the teams, I try to be extremely accommodating. I'll avoid interrupting an active warm-up, but will walk up if they're either doing static stretches or finishing off a team talk.
What I say does get modified over time, but at the moment the main things I try to discuss are my approach to advantage and quick FK's, the difference between politely asking about a decision I give vs dissent, and the correct procedure for substitutions and injuries that require treatment. I'll then finish off by doing the jewellery/boots check, before reminding them how long left until kick off and wishing them luck.
 

es1

RefChat Addict
#2
I never speak to the teams as a whole. Just let them get on with it, chat during warm up if the opportunity arises but nothing official so to speak
 

AlexF

RefChat Addict
#4
Sadly, the above guys are generally right.

Even a conversation with the captains at the coin toss longer than "heads or tails" is lost on them. They're not paying attention to you, they're focusing on being ready for the match.
 
#5
I've tended to go for something alone the lines of working as a team of 3 (or 5) if I call you in you're in to help us prevent a player being cautioned so just come in and agree with me otherwise if you're causing more argument I'll just stop bringing you in to help.

Not quite as brief as that but that's the general jist. It was something I picked up from a Level 3 and recently noticed a lot of people using.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#6
Oh I definitely agree at the coin toss - I rarely bother with anything more than Heads/Tails at that point and I've never once seen a captain pass on anything I've said at that point. I'm talking with the whole team about 15-20 minutes before kick off.
 

Cheshire Ref

RefChat Addict
#7
Graeme, its each to their own. I know some ref's that do and some that don't, personally I don't for similar reasons to everyone else above. But you do what you feel is best for you.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#8
Graeme, its each to their own. I know some ref's that do and some that don't, personally I don't for similar reasons to everyone else above. But you do what you feel is best for you.
Yeah, I'm just surprised! I thought what I did was pretty standard, certainly I've never had a team be surprised that I wanted to talk to them. But it seems to be very much the exception on here.
 

Padfoot

The Persecuted One
#10
I listened to a young referee lecturing an u14 side for 5 minutes or so on what he would and wouldn't do etc etc....

Could see them switch off after the first 30 secs...utter waste of everyone's time.....
 
#11
I listened to a young referee lecturing an u14 side for 5 minutes or so on what he would and wouldn't do etc etc....

Could see them switch off after the first 30 secs...utter waste of everyone's time.....
I agree but it is each to their own. Padfoot does make a good point here though, If you are going to do it then don't make a rod for your own back with statements like "If you do this then I will do this".

I remember back in my playing days that one ref would include in his "talk to the teams" that in a public space he does not allow swearing of any kind and boy did he mean it. Sent one of our players off for cursing himself for missing a shot. Having said that the same referee gave a penalty against us for a defender shouting leave it in the box!!!!!
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#12
I agree but it is each to their own. Padfoot does make a good point here though, If you are going to do it then don't make a rod for your own back with statements like "If you do this then I will do this"!
Oh yeah, I've made that mistake back when I started out, now try to consciously keep that kind of thing out of my speeches and general in-match chat as well.
 
#13
Personally I tend to give instructions to both managers/coaches when I introduce myself. That puts the onus on them and makes life a bit easier for me when I caution a player. I also give a brief "Right lads, all I ask is that you play to the whistle and respect my decisions" while I carry out the old boot/jewellery check. You need to create a reputation for yourself which, believe it or not, will spread amongst the teams in the league your regularly officiate in. Just be consistent in what you do and the rest will take care of itself.
 

xPositor

RefChat Addict
#14
I always brief Captains, Managers and CAR's in the centre circle whilst doing the coin toss. But that's limited to what I want the CAR's to do so everyone hears the same message.

Sunday did brief both teams during kit check with words along the lines of "its freezing cold this morning and I can barely feel my fingers, let's have a card free game as I'm not going to be able to write". Few jokey comments back, rapport set, and the cards stayed in my pocket (although I did have to record a few goals).
 

Tim H

New Member
Level 7 Referee
#15
I took the advice of a work colleague who played sem-pro rugby and said that it was the norm to have refs brief a team before the match. I keep it short but emphasise that I'm there for a game of football and if they are and don't kick the c**p out of the other lot or gob off at my decisions, then cards don't need to come out. It doesn't stop the idiots who feel the need to vent whatever problems they have out on me but certainly gives the ability to say "I did make it clear at the start"...

Each to their own though...
 
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