RefSix

Pass-backs

JH

Well-Known Member
#1
Should you ever notify a goalkeeper whether they can or cannot pick up a pass-back?

If you do, the opposition may accuse you of helping the opposition.

If you don't, the keeper's team may blame you for an infraction.

Thoughts?
 

Chrisp72

Always smiling
#2
I’ve done it a couple of times “ no hands Keeper “ not had any complaints in both situations . Whether Im right or wrong is debatable .
 

one

RefChat Addict
#3
This should be no different to using your management/communication skills to avoid having to deal with a bigger issue later. For example if I see a defender running towards a free kick location to stop a QFK I shout "move away". If the keeper is holding the ball close to 6 seconds or a player is taking his time for a restart I shout "let's go". Or if I see a defender being too aggressive in a challenge and is in danger of giving a FK or penalty away, I shout "be careful".

In the case of a back-pass I don't say anything for an obvious back-pass, the keeper (and everyone else) should know. In a not so obvious back-pass it helps to say "no hands". If you get a complaint from the opponents, just quietly tell them you are not sure if you would have given a free kick, you just didn't want to have to make a controversial decision one way or other and you do it for both sides.

The added bonus is, if you do have to give a free kick or sanction, it is much easier to sell the decision.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#5
Yes, but be very careful what you say. I once tried to help a keeper by shouting "Don't use your hands", only to see the keeper pick the ball up and then try to claim that he hadn't heard the word "Don't".
 

Ciley Myrus

I came in like a wrecking ball?
#9
I have heard me saying "passback" if I deem it to be so, and this has been standard for certainly officials I have worled with over the years. Granted this comes from regularity of using comms but its a habit I am still in

If its one of those where the ball is trundling towards the keeper and I take an educated guess about what might happen next, I shout. " keeper, you can lift"

As alluded to above, thats just managment of the game and no diff to proactive things like, hands down, no pushing, dont foul, let the keeper kick, and so on
 

OIREF!

RefChat Addict
#11
This past Saturday, for the first time in a while, I had to penalise a clear pass back. The goalkeeper argued that he was entitled to pick it up as the pass had been volleyed rather than played along the ground!
 
#12
I don’t agree with the consensus here ...
Thin end of a dangerous wedge and different from advice to avoid a foul. I would never offer such advice to a keeper. What next: warn a player he’s offside, or tell him it’s ok he’s not?
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
#13
I don’t agree with the consensus here ...
Thin end of a dangerous wedge and different from advice to avoid a foul. I would never offer such advice to a keeper. What next: warn a player he’s offside, or tell him it’s ok he’s not?
I warn players that they're in the area so they need to watch their hands when in a wall, I warn them when they're pushing the limits of dissent or persistent infringement, I warn them not to play before my whistle when I want a FK to be ceremonial. Just this weekend I went and had a chat with both managers at the half way point of extra time and made sure they realised their penalty takers needed to be on the pitch at the final whistle if it went that far (it didn't!).

A lot of refereeing is subjective to an extent, and it's much easier to sell a decision when you've just warned players it's a possibility.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#14
I don’t agree with the consensus here ...
Thin end of a dangerous wedge and different from advice to avoid a foul. I would never offer such advice to a keeper. What next: warn a player he’s offside, or tell him it’s ok he’s not?
You say its different from advice to avoid a foul but then you liken it to warning a player he is offside?
 

Ciley Myrus

I came in like a wrecking ball?
#15
I don’t agree with the consensus here ...
Thin end of a dangerous wedge and different from advice to avoid a foul. I would never offer such advice to a keeper. What next: warn a player he’s offside, or tell him it’s ok he’s not?

Imo being proactive and preventing a breach or possible breach of the laws is a positive thing.
As for warning a player that he is offside, thats more complex, as its not an offence to be in an offside position.....
 
#16
I believe players respect the advice offered. Never, ever had one complaint when I've advised on a deliberate pass. "No hands keeper" and "hands are ok" are what I use.
 
#17
The approach I take with this has worked well over the years for me and not caused any problems for me (famous last words) for an clear and obvious back pass where no ambiguity exists, I won't interfere, and if the @keeper handles the ball there will be zero surprise when the whistle goes.

Where I will shout "Not a back pass", or alternatively "Back Pass, no hands", is where there could be a question over was it / wasn't it. E.g defender slices the ball, defender tackles and the ball rolls back to the keeper, ball played off a shin or knee (or i do deem it a deliberate pass back); that way everyone is clear before the keeper handles it that I'm not going to be awarding a free kick for handling the ball, so leaves the players limited options for appealing the decision.

If a player does ask why I was "helping the opponent", and the same would be true for "hands down", "don't back in" and other go-to proactive verbal warnings and managements , a simple "you'll get the same courtesy" has always sufficed.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#19
ball played off a shin or knee (or i do deem it a deliberate pass back);
Hard to tell from your phrasing if you deem playing off the shin or knee a back-pass but the latest IFAB circular clarifies playing off the shin or knee is not considered a kick and hence not a back-pass.
I agree with the rest of your post though. In fact it resembles my post #3 ;)
 
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