RefSix

New Write On Card System

#1
Write-on-Cards UK have developed a range of Write On referee match cards to help side referees and develop their match control. For years I have used match books, card skins, paper pads, and much more. However, until now I haven’t found anything that works consistently in all weathers.

Until now!! I have developed some match cards that can be used in all weathers with pencil or pen.

All can be ordered here; https://forms.gle/pF6Kgp8ijGrnrUT36

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RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
#3
Which cards specifically do premier league referees use? And where can i purchase them online?
varies between referee. I saw Lee Mason was using masking tape on his yellow card, whereas Jon Moss seems to have a blank white card with his yellow to write on.
 
#5
I’d say that for most of us basing anything on what the PL refs do is silly. They have a 4O tracking everything for them as well, and they know who all the players are.
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
#6
I’d say that for most of us basing anything on what the PL refs do is silly. They have a 4O tracking everything for them as well, and they know who all the players are.
Indeed, and also in England you have to take the fact that referees at steps 2 and below must take the names of players for cautions and send offs and if you copied the PL referees you’d be taken to the cleaners by observers.
 

Brian Hamilton

I am the storm
Observer/Tutor
#7
Indeed, and also in England you have to take the fact that referees at steps 2 and below must take the names of players for cautions and send offs and if you copied the PL referees you’d be taken to the cleaners by observers.
Not entirely true. It would be noted as a development point and mentioned in the report. If it affected the game, it would affect the mark.
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Not entirely true. It would be noted as a development point and mentioned in the report. If it affected the game, it would affect the mark.
That depends on the observer unfortunately. And even though I agree and I would usually go minor development advice, Ive seen it where I, and therefore others, can’t tell who had been cautioned and that then gets into the realms of major development advice.

Plus at grass roots the guidance is different and I know a lot of observers that would carpet the referee for this.
 

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#9
I think the correct sanction process is really important. I know, because I'm still getting distracted from following it in the proper sequence. Messy
 

PP62

Well-Known Member
#10
I think the correct sanction process is really important. I know, because I'm still getting distracted from following it in the proper sequence. Messy
Good advice and I follow the correct procedure. However, even at grass roots level, I believe (only in extreme cases) a quick red card can work for you and potentially prevent a mass confrontation. It's worked a couple of times for me; once on a 5-4 assessment. The assessor didn't like it but agreed it had worked for me that day.
 
#11
Write-on-Cards UK have developed a range of Write On referee match cards to help side referees and develop their match control. For years I have used match books, card skins, paper pads, and much more. However, until now I haven’t found anything that works consistently in all weathers.

Until now!! I have developed some match cards that can be used in all weathers with pencil or pen.

All can be ordered here; https://forms.gle/pF6Kgp8ijGrnrUT36

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I have used these cards to great effect and can 100% confirm they work very effectively. I would highly recommend them the best I have found to date.
 

Brian Hamilton

I am the storm
Observer/Tutor
#12
That depends on the observer unfortunately. And even though I agree and I would usually go minor development advice, Ive seen it where I, and therefore others, can’t tell who had been cautioned and that then gets into the realms of major development advice.

Plus at grass roots the guidance is different and I know a lot of observers that would carpet the referee for this.
Not being able to tell who has been cautioned is a major for me as it shows poor technique in that the offender has not been isolated effectively.
I think the correct sanction process is really important. I know, because I'm still getting distracted from following it in the proper sequence. Messy
Take your time; use it to dissipate tension. It's your time.
Good advice and I follow the correct procedure. However, even at grass roots level, I believe (only in extreme cases) a quick red card can work for you and potentially prevent a mass confrontation. It's worked a couple of times for me; once on a 5-4 assessment. The assessor didn't like it but agreed it had worked for me that day.
A quick red to defuse a situation should be regarded as a plus point if it is done correctly.
 
#13
As an American, I actually like the normal English carding method for cautions more than charging in and showing the card right away. If I can get the player isolated and talk to him/her for a moment, it often tends to defuse the situation. I had a high school girls regional final last May where the home team's defender wiped out the visitor's attacker on a reckless challenge near the corner flag. Clear yellow. The attacker was slow to get up and the players were entangled. I was on the scene (also with my AR, who was advising caution as well) and talked to the players to let them know we had stopped play and I would have a caution for the defender. I made sure she was away from the attacker and then showed the card. Neither coach had an issue, and a potential flash point went off without incident. I really would like to think my slow card helped defuse some of the possible tension.

However, I do think showing a red card (or even "flying in" with a red) has a place to mitigate additional trouble. If I have a nasty tackle or a punch and I can come sprinting in with the card showing, that can let the team that will soon be playing up that they don't need to retaliate (of course, they can still retaliate and then we play 10 v 10 :) ).

So long story short, I think there is a time and a place for a fast card, but I would like to lean more toward the English method of showing the card for your run of the mill cautions. However, I can see where in the US it would look like I was indecisive or listening to the crowd when issuing a card in a more measured manner.
 
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