RefSix

Leave it or not

#1
Does anyone know if there is a clear and definite rule with regards to players shouting out things such as my ball and leave it etc?

I had a game today where the keeper a few times would say "leave it keepers ball" and he said "leave it Chris ball"which is his name. Is that allowed or not.

The opponents were moaning about it but I was not too sure really hence the reason I asked.

I have looked everywhere for it but have not found any definite rule.

Please could someone help me and let me know.
 

svenny76

RefChat Addict
#2
As far as I'm aware they can shout what ever they like and it only becomes an infringmment if they're doing it to purposely put off an opponent.
 
Likes: SM

SM

The avuncular one
#3
The laws state that it is USB to verbally distract an opponent while the ball is in play or at a restart. In theory you can shout whatever you like, unless you feel it is for the purposes of distracting an opponent. If you blow for it, it's always a caution and idfk. (Or retake if it was at a penalty which doesn't result in a goal)

No players know this it seems :)
 

HullRef

RefChat Addict
#4
Yeah +1 for supermonkey's answer. Also the easiest way to explain it to players is to say that the LOTG don't stipulate the words that can and cannot be said on the pitch. I get this appeal at least once a game :)
 

Southend-ref

Southend United Supporter
Level 6 Referee
#5
Somebody has created a myth that you're not allowed to say "leave it". Some referees don't know the law and so penalise players for saying it which means that players now do not know the law and complain when referees who do know the law do not enforce this myth.
 
#6
I had this on Saturday, had a quiet word with the culprit, the away team wanted a booking.

I explained the laws but the words "he can't say leave it ref" was the concensus from both sides :)
 

Southend-ref

Southend United Supporter
Level 6 Referee
#7
I had this on Saturday, had a quiet word with the culprit, the away team wanted a booking.

I explained the laws but the words "he can't say leave it ref" was the concensus from both sides :)
But by having a word with him you are suggesting that he is in the wrong, which he isn't, he is perfectly entitled to say that so long as it is for genuine, honest purposes.
 

Reffariiii

RefChat Addict
#9
So many times people have insisted that 'leave it' or 'mine' is a foul, even at a high level. I only ever pulled it up once and cautioned for it. They were happy about the FK but not YC? :alien:
 

Southend-ref

Southend United Supporter
Level 6 Referee
#10
So many times people have insisted that 'leave it' or 'mine' is a foul, even at a high level. I only ever pulled it up once and cautioned for it. They were happy about the FK but not YC? :alien:
The IDFK is for stopping the game to caution, not the offence itself, if that makes sense.
 

Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#11
I merely explained to him the potential for USB if it was being done to distract the defensive line, but I take your point.
But it's YOUR decision as to whether it's being done to distract the defending line. If it was being done so, it is a caution, not a talking to; if it wasn't, there is no need to speak to him.
 

Top man in the parish

Active Member
Level 5 Referee
#12
In days of yore the law stated that a player could not call to 'delude an opponent', which was (in the day) Ungentlemanly conduct and a cautionable offence.

Shouts of 'my ball' and 'leave it' are normally fine if everyone can see exactly who's doing the shouting, but if an attacker (from behind a defender) calls 'leave it', gains possession and then scores, it might lead to teddy coming out of the cot

I think it was accepted that players from each side would know each others names and 'trust' the call with a name attached, perhaps that was the birth of the myth described above? It was certainly okay to do it playing as a kid in the 60's, 'My ball Tommy' or 'Let it come one more Dave' etc

A case of 'judge each situation on its individual merits' is best applied here? IFK and a yellow if you're viewing it as deliberately 'deluding'. You can tell the original laws were drawn up by University types, Eh What?
 
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