RefSix

Heading the ball back to keeper repeatedly (pass back / timewasting ?)

Boonjj

New Member
#1
A keeper is holding the ball in their box, legally, in open play. The keeper then kicks the ball at head height to their defender or any close by teammate, who then immediately, with their first touch, heads the ball back to the keeper, who then catches the ball in the air first time.

This team repeats this tactic over and over and over again. The intent is clearly to waste time because their team is leading by a goal, and they continually do it even when their players are not under pressure from the opposing team.

Does this break any rules, and if so, which ones?
Does the receiver of the goalies pass being in or outside the box matter?
What action, if any, should be taken and to whom?

Thank you.
 
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one

RefChat Addict
#4
1. A field defender deliberately kicks the ball up and heads it back to the keeper to pick it up. Is this an offence? Yes, punishable by a caution and IFK restart.

2. A field defender deliberately kicks the ball up to another nearby defender who deliberately heads it back to the keeper to pick it up. Is this an offence? Yes, punishable by a caution and IFK restart.

3. The goalkeeper deliberately kicks the ball up to another nearby defender who deliberately heads it back to the keeper to pick it up. Is this an offence? Yes, punishable by a caution and IFK restart.

In cases 2 and 3 you'd want to make sure it's deliberate. If done repeatedly as a tactic it is. I'd warn after the first time to prevent it from happening again.
 
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Boonjj

New Member
#5
3. The goalkeeper deliberately kicks the ball up to another nearby defender who deliberately heads it back to the keeper to pick it up. Is this an offence? Yes, punishable by a caution and IFK restart.

In cases 2 and 3 you'd want to make sure it's deliberate. If done repeatedly as a tactic it is. I'd warn after the first time to prevent it from happening again.
The goalkeeper didn't pick it up. He caught it in the air.
 
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one

RefChat Addict
#6
The goalkeeper didn't pick it up. He caught it in the air.
Makes no different whatsoever for case 3 or the other cases.

I edited the post to give it correct numbering :)

EDIT: I must add it is still an offence even if the keeper does not pick it up (or catch it)
 

Boonjj

New Member
#7
Makes no different whatsoever for case 3 or the other cases.

I edited the post to give it correct numbering :)

EDIT: I must add it is still an offence even if the keeper does not pick it up (or catch it)
May I ask what specific rule this is breaking?

The header, I don't think, qualifies as "trickery". It is just a standard/"usual" header, played first time, after receiving an air, head-height pass.

Thanks.
 

santa sangria

RefChat Addict
#8
"uses a deliberate trick to pass the ball (including from a free kick) to the goalkeeper with the head, chest, knee etc. to circumvent the Law, whether or not the goalkeeper touches the ball with the hands"
It's law 12.
Page 106.
It's an offence.

It's a deliberate trick - not a complicated one - to circumvent the Law to pass the ball to the goalkeeper.
It's also a mandatory caution (yellow card).

This line in law 12 is specifically for this offence.
(My understanding is that the "whether or not..." is added in case there is some very elaborate trick that the keeper then tries to not act on - just the act of trying the trick is enough for the offence, YC).

@one is spot on here. I am a little surprised at posts #2 and #3 ;)
 

santa sangria

RefChat Addict
#9
The header, I don't think, qualifies as "trickery". It is just a standard/"usual" header, played first time, after receiving an air, head-height pass.
You are contradicting yourself:
"The intent is clearly to waste time because their team is leading by a goal".

It's not standard. It's what the LotG describes as a "deliberate trick to pass the ball to the goalkeeper with the head".

(My bold by the way;))
 

Mintyref

RefChat Addict
#10
"uses a deliberate trick to pass the ball (including from a free kick) to the goalkeeper with the head, chest, knee etc. to circumvent the Law, whether or not the goalkeeper touches the ball with the hands"
It's law 12.
Page 106.
It's an offence.

It's a deliberate trick - not a complicated one - to circumvent the Law to pass the ball to the goalkeeper.
It's also a mandatory caution (yellow card).

This line in law 12 is specifically for this offence.
(My understanding is that the "whether or not..." is added in case there is some very elaborate trick that the keeper then tries to not act on - just the act of trying the trick is enough for the offence, YC).

@one is spot on here. I am a little surprised at posts #2 and #3 ;)
Where's the trick?
 

RobOda

RefChat Addict
#12
3. The goalkeeper deliberately kicks the ball up to another nearby defender who deliberately heads it back to the keeper to pick it up. Is this an offence? Yes, punishable by a caution and IFK restart.
For situation 3 do we caution the keeper... or the defender passing it back? I'm thinking the defender, but I'm also thinking that a caution to the keeper would actually shut that trick down completely as they won't want the keeper to risk it again...
 

Ciley Myrus

RefChat Addict
#13
For situation 3 do we caution the keeper... or the defender passing it back? I'm thinking the defender, but I'm also thinking that a caution to the keeper would actually shut that trick down completely as they won't want the keeper to risk it again...

That would need to be the defender as we cant caution the gk for using his hands in his area ( I think!)
 

one

RefChat Addict
#17
Where's the trick?
Playing devil's advocate, obvious tricks are a player flicking it up to head back or diving to head a ball that is on the floor back to the keeper. Is the keeper throwing it to a team mate to head it back to him really a trick? Is that not just a pass and a return pass?
The trick is the combination of one player lifting it (or throwing it) to the other player's head and the second player heading it back. If you want to stick to the wording of the law and say the law says "a player" then I'd say the fact they are using more than one player to avoid getting caught is on its own circumventing the law.

In other words they know one player can't do it, so they use more than one player to circumvent it. How much more crafty (tricky) can you get.

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For situation 3 do we caution the keeper... or the defender passing it back? I'm thinking the defender, but I'm also thinking that a caution to the keeper would actually shut that trick down completely as they won't want the keeper to risk it again...
The first one who meant it as a trick. In the OP its clear they both did so i'd say the keeper. But TBH I won't be too upset if you deservedly caution them both because the both take part in circumventing the law and making a mockery out of it. But that wont help game control.
 
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#19
This is clearly circumvention.... Are people seriously claiming it isn't? Warn once, then card. Some people are getting way, way too hung up on the word 'trick' and trying to find hidden meanings that aren't there.
It’s right there under cautionable offences... If you blow you have to caution... though of course a smart ref could let the first one go and get in a clear warning, but I’m struggling with economical wording and imagining it;)
 
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