First time as AT next week, any tips?

anonref

New Member
Level 8 Referee
#1
Hi guys,

I was assigned as an AR to a county cup final next week and being new in the refereeing world, as well as it being my first time as an AR, I was wondering whether you guys could just remind me of the basics and any other tips you've got.
I'm very nervous about it as I'm pretty young and inexperienced as a linesman, so any help is welcome!

Thanks
 

Tino Best

Well-Known Member
#2
Listen to your ref. Be strong with your signals. Stay with the "last man" Keep a running commentary of who is on and off side learn from the ref and enjoy. Being on the line is a good learning tool for new refs and a it is great working in a team of three. Oh yeah and remember to use your flag. I did a final this week and just used my hand to signal for one decision. I thought I had got away with it until it was mentioned at half time much to the hilarity of the ref and the other assistant!:mute:
 

Padfoot

The Enlightened One
#3
Why do CFA's appoint officials to their first line on cup finals?

Worst possible scenario for someone to make their debut as an assistant.
 

Mintyref

Well-Known Member
#4
Why do CFA's appoint officials to their first line on cup finals?

Worst possible scenario for someone to make their debut as an assistant.
Probably because for most of us, they're only games with appointed assistants.
That's where the problem lies.
 

Justylove

Well-Known Member
#5
Firstly let the ref know it's your first game on the line, he may spend a little more time with you pre match than normal.

Secindly listen to what the ref and the other assistant has to say, not only is it important, but listening to experienced officials really helps your own development as a referee.

Thirdly - running the line is a completely different perspective than being in the middle. It's going to be really important to concentrate and not get sucked into ball watching, especially when play is at the other end of the pitch, if it breaks quickly up to your end, you can easily end up a long way out of position.

Fourth take your time on offside decisions, don't think you've got to make a snap decision and get the flag up in record time, take a second to assess then put it up if you need to.

Fifth try to make good eye contact with the referee when the ball is out of play, he might be indicating that he knows which way he is giving a decision, or looking for your help. If for any reason you "cross" (give a different decision to the referee) drop your flag as quickly as possible.

Sixth - enjoy it!
 

Emil

New Member
Level 7 Referee
#6
Good luck!
The hardest thing as AR is not to ball-watch; like everyone else, you'll be attracted to watch the ball, only to then realise your offside line has moved 10 yards or so. So concentrate on always watching your offside line (it may get hard if play is happening along the touch line).

Also, take your time. You don't get extra points for lifting your flag early and being the first to signal. So take an extra second, esp. on throw-ins - look at the referee to make sure you're going in the same direction.

Finally, respect areas of competence; it is easy to want to do too much and take over the game, especially given that you're a referee by training. Think about which decisions are yours, and which are the ref's. And believe me, you'll have plenty with your area of competence anyway.

Good luck!
 

anonref

New Member
Level 8 Referee
#7
Listen to your ref. Be strong with your signals. Stay with the "last man" Keep a running commentary of who is on and off side learn from the ref and enjoy. Being on the line is a good learning tool for new refs and a it is great working in a team of three. Oh yeah and remember to use your flag. I did a final this week and just used my hand to signal for one decision. I thought I had got away with it until it was mentioned at half time much to the hilarity of the ref and the other assistant!:mute:
Firstly let the ref know it's your first game on the line, he may spend a little more time with you pre match than normal.

Secindly listen to what the ref and the other assistant has to say, not only is it important, but listening to experienced officials really helps your own development as a referee.

Thirdly - running the line is a completely different perspective than being in the middle. It's going to be really important to concentrate and not get sucked into ball watching, especially when play is at the other end of the pitch, if it breaks quickly up to your end, you can easily end up a long way out of position.

Fourth take your time on offside decisions, don't think you've got to make a snap decision and get the flag up in record time, take a second to assess then put it up if you need to.

Fifth try to make good eye contact with the referee when the ball is out of play, he might be indicating that he knows which way he is giving a decision, or looking for your help. If for any reason you "cross" (give a different decision to the referee) drop your flag as quickly as possible.

Sixth - enjoy it!
Good luck!
The hardest thing as AR is not to ball-watch; like everyone else, you'll be attracted to watch the ball, only to then realise your offside line has moved 10 yards or so. So concentrate on always watching your offside line (it may get hard if play is happening along the touch line).

Also, take your time. You don't get extra points for lifting your flag early and being the first to signal. So take an extra second, esp. on throw-ins - look at the referee to make sure you're going in the same direction.

Finally, respect areas of competence; it is easy to want to do too much and take over the game, especially given that you're a referee by training. Think about which decisions are yours, and which are the ref's. And believe me, you'll have plenty with your area of competence anyway.

Good luck!
Thanks all!
 

Tino Best

Well-Known Member
#8
Padfoot, I was lucky I ran the line on a couple of semi finals before having my first final on the line, but unless you are being given lines regulary here in Suffolk there is not much ARs at the lowest level, but if you are a ref you know what your ARs want to do so you do that. We all should know how to run the line as level 7s and above, but there aren't the games to do it in my area.
 

zarathustra

Well-Known Member
#9
As others have said, listen to and follow the refs pre match instructions, avoid ball watching and stick with either the "last man", or the ball (which ever is closer to the goal line).

Try to crab (side step) as much as you can, and always keep the flag in the hand closest to the ref, except when signalling etc. When you need to change hands to signal an attacking throw (for example) switch hands before signalling, don't do it over your head.

Finally, your first time can be quite overwhelming, especially if there's a large crowd, but try and relax and enjoy the occasion. If you relax then you're more likely to find your groove, and when you're relaxed and confident everything becomes a little easier, and it shows to the players and spectators that you know what you're doing.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.


@Padfoot i guess it depends on the area and leagues that you referee in, and the individual referees.

My Saturday league use NARs for all the premier division games and cup competitions at quarter final and above, so we have scope to get more time on the line.

last season I felt more time on the line would be beneficial, so I registered as an AR on the Ryman Development League, and I've found that experience has greatly helped in not only improving my AR abilities, but also with my refereeing in general.
 

anonref

New Member
Level 8 Referee
#11
Follow up to my q earlier this week...

I'm not quite sure at what point I should signal for a substitution (eg. when the 4th official holds up his board etc.) also is it both linesman that should signal for the substitution or just the one on the side of the managers?

Thanks.
 

JamesL

Well-Known Member
#13
The signal is to indicate to the referee that a substitution is being requested. If you havent got buzzers and the referee has his back to the senior AR and/or the 4th official then you can mirror the signal to alert the referee to the request.
 

PinnerPaul

Well-Known Member
#14
Probably because for most of us, they're only games with appointed assistants.
That's where the problem lies.
That's simply not true. I'm a level 7 and AR on Womens PL (2 divs I can do), Ryman U18 & Ryman U21. There are academy games, county rep games and of course SEMI finals where experience as an AR can be gained.

Also there are plenty of O/A leagues that use L7 ARs.
 

zarathustra

Well-Known Member
#15
That's simply not true. I'm a level 7 and AR on Womens PL (2 divs I can do), Ryman U18 & Ryman U21. There are academy games, county rep games and of course SEMI finals where experience as an AR can be gained.

Also there are plenty of O/A leagues that use L7 ARs.
But, much of this rests on the shoulders of the referee in question.

I went and registered with the Ryman development league specifically to get more experience as an ar and to work with more senior referees.

I don't have any local leagues which always use ARs, so my only other option would be to wait until the league appoints me, and last season including a cup final I did maybe 5 or 6 lines.

This season I've done 18 lines, because I went out and looked for the opportunities.
 

PinnerPaul

Well-Known Member
#16
But, much of this rests on the shoulders of the referee in question.

I went and registered with the Ryman development league specifically to get more experience as an ar and to work with more senior referees.

I don't have any local leagues which always use ARs, so my only other option would be to wait until the league appoints me, and last season including a cup final I did maybe 5 or 6 lines.

This season I've done 18 lines, because I went out and looked for the opportunities.
Agree with all that - I was replying to MintyRef who implied that Cup Finals were the only games available to L7s to AR on.

Like may things in refereeing, you need to put a bit of effort in to get what you want.

I should have added I get at least 3 emails a week asking for ARs on various competitions throughout the season - another opportunity.
 

zarathustra

Well-Known Member
#17
Agree with all that - I was replying to MintyRef who implied that Cup Finals were the only games available to L7s to AR on.

Like may things in refereeing, you need to put a bit of effort in to get what you want.

I should have added I get at least 3 emails a week asking for ARs on various competitions throughout the season - another opportunity.
Apologies, misread your post.