RefSix

First Cup Final Middle

#1
Hi guys,

I’ve signed up to this forum anonymously to make a post relating to a County Cup Final I’ve been appointed as referee for.
The reason I’m posting anonymously is because this is not only the first County Cup final I’ve refereed it’s also the first open age game I’ve ever referred with neutral ARs (and a 4th man obviously). One of my ARs I know has previously viewed this site, and I don’t partiularly want them to know that this is the first game I’ve done like this as I want them to be full of confidence in me as a referee.

I’m going for 7-6 this season and was quite shocked to be appointed referee for the final in question but hopefully it means I’m doing something right!
What I’m after is just any advice you can offer. Advice about the prematch with my assistants, advice on using neutral ARs and a 4th man, advice on refereeing cup finals in general and how they differ to refereeing normal games (if they do).

Any advice you could offer will be gratefully received.
 

Mintyref

RefChat Addict
#2
Most referee's first experience of officiating with neutral assistants is in a cup semi final or final.....nothing new here...........
 

one

RefChat Addict
#3
Where i am Semi/Finals are reward games. Many referees are good enough to do the game and the most qualified doesn't necessarily get the game. Dedication, reliability and a whole lot more comes into it.

It take it you have had NARs before but not in combination with other things like OA, cup game ....

Make sure you let them know what to do if you miss their flag. Hopefully they are experienced ARs and know their duties well already.

Work as a team and be seen to be working as a team . You are the team leader.
 
Last edited:

Sheffields Finest

Maybe I'm foolish, maybe I'm blind!
#4
Enjoy the experience and try not to mess up, people tend to remember marquee games more and your name doesn’t need to be majorly mentioned in dispatches l! 👍
 
#5
Where i am Semi/Finals are reward games. Many referees are good enough to do the game and the most qualified doesn't necessarily get the game. Dedication, reliability and a whole lot more comes into it.

It take it you have had NARs before but not in combination with other things like OA, cup game ....

Make sure you let them know what to do if you miss their flag. Hopefully they are experienced ARs and know their duties well already.

Work as a team and be seen to be working as a team . You are the team leader.
I’ve done one game before with neutral ARs. An u14s game in a tournament day that was 10 minutes long lol
 

Ciley Myrus

RefChat Addict
#6
Your missing a vital trait to not just refereeing, but life in general
Honesty

Maybe just how the post is written, or how I read it, but, if your going to strive for a successful team performance, snippets off an internet forum might help, but there is no substitute for reality.

You cant disguise confidence. Or fake it.
 
#7
As others have said, these games are rewards so you should take great confidence that the appointment officer has seen fit to give you the game. That said, OA can be different to youth and NARs bring different challenges / opportunities to CARs so you're right to prepare for these differences.

I'd consider @Ciley Myrus view that honesty with your fellow officials might stand you in good stead. Finding a way to tell them the reality of the situation but in a way that maintains their belief in you is your challenge. Tricky .. but not impossible!

At the end of the day, you are in charge of the team. With the 4O, I'd keep it to a few key basics like how would you like him to control the flow of replacement balls (only on your signal or at his discretion?) and how to manage substitutions (eg alert you only when player is completely ready). Plus he needs to be 100% clear on who is on the FOP at the end of time in case it goes to penalties.

With your NARs, there are plenty of previous threads to search for on here that have covered that topic. Most important thing is to understand if they are experienced or inexperienced assistants. If the former, then they'll be most interested in how you want to manage those areas where referees tend to differ (credibility area for fouls, who leads on throw ins etc). If the latter then you'll need to brief more thoroughly but don't overwhelm them, again keep it to the key areas you want them to get right ... eye contact before any decision, take time on (most) offsides etc etc.

The very best of luck. We can compare notes after as I have my first County Cup final middle next week .. but I'm 6 years into Open Age reffing!
 

Ciley Myrus

RefChat Addict
#8
The above is a good match situation summary

Whilst my other post might not seem as practical, it was typed with point of view that if was me as your AR tomorrow, I would know as you placed kit bag in dressing room that you were, newer.
Thats not a fault, merely a factual observation

To then try to be anything that you are not, you have lost me, 2 mins after meeting

Be upfront, hey guys, great we are on this game today, as you prob know am a bit fresh round ears when it comes to these kinda games, if we could all help each other out today that would be great

Is a better approach than storming in quoting instructions from a web site
 
#11
Try your best to see the first offside flags. It will give you confidence.

You know your football well enough to glance at your AR everytime there is a through ball or any situation with a potential offside.
 

RobOda

RefChat Addict
#13
. Finding a way to tell them the reality of the situation but in a way that maintains their belief in you is your challenge. Tricky .. but not impossible!
I'm sure they'd be understanding. Everyone has to start somewhere after all.

For the OP:

I'd just be up-front with the other officials, for example; explain that this might cause you to miss more flags than other more experienced officials but that you will strive to ensure you don't miss any. Although you're the 'leader' on the day, stress that you're open to feedback, especially at half-time on what you can do to improve team-work between the three of you.

If you have a willingness to learn as well as lead, then I don't see too much issue. I remember my first final at youth level, half the society turned up to show support and the two very senior assistants went to great lengths to re-assure me and put me at ease. Even the league referee's sec popped in pre-match to settle the nerves.

I guess my end point is, don't be shy about your inexperience in the situation, I think the other officials will appreciate the honesty and will accommodate that inexperience, and hey, they might be inexperienced themselves, in which case, you have a group learning experience on your hands. :)

End of the day though; Try and have fun and enjoy it.
 
Top