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Dutch Referee Blog - Week 31 Laws of the Game Quiz 2018-2019

J

Jan ter Harmsel

Guest
#1
Week 31 Laws of the Game Quiz 2018-2019. An attacker prevents a goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands and his kick got blocked. The goalkeeper is frustrated and strikes the attacker in the face with his fist, using excessive force. What does the referee decide? The quiz Bezig met laden…

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#2
Good quiz Sir Jan of Dutch Referee Blog.

The foot or the ankle.

I think this is bad.
Where does the ankle stop and shin begin?
So, you can play a controlled pass with the thigh but it’s not a kick, but a shank off the shin is?

I guess that it depends if the only contexts in the new book for ”kick” are dead balls, then ot makes sense...
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#3
Good quiz Sir Jan of Dutch Referee Blog.

The foot or the ankle.

I think this is bad.
Where does the ankle stop and shin begin?
So, you can play a controlled pass with the thigh but it’s not a kick, but a shank off the shin is?

I guess that it depends if the only contexts in the new book for ”kick” are dead balls, then ot makes sense...
It's used for more than restarts. Example being back pass.

Had to read these questions very carefully
 

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#4
Good quiz Sir Jan of Dutch Referee Blog.

The foot or the ankle.

I think this is bad.
Where does the ankle stop and shin begin?
So, you can play a controlled pass with the thigh but it’s not a kick, but a shank off the shin is?

I guess that it depends if the only contexts in the new book for ”kick” are dead balls, then ot makes sense...
The ball never made contact with my shin (even ankle would've been debatable), back in the day ;)
 

socal lurker

Well-Known Member
#6
You get I’m referring to the LotG. I feel playing the ball with the thigh should be treated as a ”kick”.
It's not and never has been. And it makes sense. The original evil the back pass was aimed at was the stultifying long passes back to the GK--which could only be done by the foot (well, also TIs, but that's a different provision). The close plays were more of an add on positive effect. If the thigh, why not the chest or the head, too? It's not going to change unless there is a high profile play that IFAB thinks was unfair.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#7
Sorry Mr Jan ter Harmsel, I am going to make some criticism here on the wording of the questions answers (I have to have a whinge when I don't get a perfect score :) ).

Q2. "The attacker is in a goal scoring position". using "the" you must be referring to the substitute. An unauthorised (extra) person on the field is not an attacker and referring to him/her as such is incorrectly misleading quizzers :)

Q5. The laws say "The ball is kicked when a player makes contact with the foot and/or the ankle". Your definition "The ball is kicked when a player makes contact with both the foot and the ankle" is incorrect. For example If I kick the ball with my toe, then by your definition I have not kicked it because it did not make contact with my ankle.
 
#8
It's not and never has been. And it makes sense. The original evil the back pass was aimed at was the stultifying long passes back to the GK--which could only be done by the foot (well, also TIs, but that's a different provision). The close plays were more of an add on positive effect. If the thigh, why not the chest or the head, too? It's not going to change unless there is a high profile play that IFAB thinks was unfair.
You can play long accurate passes with the ankle but not the thigh?

Rather highlights my point
 

socal lurker

Well-Known Member
#9
You can play long accurate passes with the ankle but not the thigh?

Rather highlights my point
My take is that they added ankle because it can be hard to tell if it was really the foot or hit higher up, and they didn’t want refs using it as a cop out. But that’s a guess.

Personally, I’d be fine getting rid of the distinctions and just saying if a teammate deliberately plays the ball the GK can’t use hands. Also gets rid of the whole trickery issue.
 
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