RefSix

Card Protocol

JH

Well-Known Member
#1
I usually just take numbers down and get the name from the team sheet after the game, it's quicker and there's no chance they can give a false name or another player's name.

Is there any reason I should be taking names instead?

What do other people on here do?
 

Brian Hamilton

I am the storm
Observer/Tutor
#5
The FA have recently issued guidance to all referees who operate at Level 2B, 3 and 4 (and to the Observers who watch them) to say that they should follow the correct procedure. This procedure is stop the game, isolate the player, take their name, warn them as to their future conduct and then show the yellow card.

Any referee not following this procedure, for example by flashing the card, can expect to have it noted in their Observer report. It could take an 8.0 to a 7.0 for Application of Law.
 

lincs22

Supply League Observer
Staff member
Observer/Tutor
#6
I usually just take numbers down and get the name from the team sheet after the game, it's quicker and there's no chance they can give a false name or another player's name.

Is there any reason I should be taking names instead?

What do other people on here do?
As @Brian Hamilton says, that policy is against FA guidence. Only L1 and 2A are allowed this policy.
If there is an appeal, how can you define a claim of mistaken identity if you don't take the name? The FA would have to let the player off and possible charge you for failing to follow correct procedure. If you were on a promotion scheme, that could cost you the next level.

Also, some referees are taking the names by use of their smartwatches and apps. While the FA guidance does not cover this directly, you need to show that you understand the reasoning.

If you have teamsheets, put the names in the book before you commence the game - soooo much easier.
 

WilliamD

Well-Known Member
#7
I’m a good boy and follow procedure correctly but I would say that 8/10 players look surprised at how long it’s taking and the fact that I even want to talk to them. Partly last weeks ref’s fault and mostly what they see on TV with the flash cards or cards from across the pitch. On the other side of the debate I can also think of a number of times where the slower procedure has cooled the temperature of the match and helped settle things.
 

alexgr

Well-Known Member
#8
I’m a good boy and follow procedure correctly but I would say that 8/10 players look surprised at how long it’s taking and the fact that I even want to talk to them. Partly last weeks ref’s fault and mostly what they see on TV with the flash cards or cards from across the pitch. On the other side of the debate I can also think of a number of times where the slower procedure has cooled the temperature of the match and helped settle things.
I agree with this but also think the opposite can be true. Sometimes a quick flash of a card can diffuse a situation that might otherwise turn nasty - players see you acting quick, rather than rushing in, they know you're dealing with it. Works both ways I think.
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#9
I agree with this but also think the opposite can be true. Sometimes a quick flash of a card can diffuse a situation that might otherwise turn nasty - players see you acting quick, rather than rushing in, they know you're dealing with it. Works both ways I think.
Only with a red I think. A caution, no. You can easily take the yellow out in your hand to indicate the your next actions but you should then follow the procedure as states in the guidelines.
 

jofusref

RefChat Addict
#10
whats every ones thought on using the record of the game cards with 18 spaces, write the names before the game, then if an incident happens write the time and the offence code, ofcourse this works better if you get the team lines early enough
 

joe cunningham

Well-Known Member
#11
The FA have recently issued guidance to all referees who operate at Level 2B, 3 and 4 (and to the Observers who watch them) to say that they should follow the correct procedure. This procedure is stop the game, isolate the player, take their name, warn them as to their future conduct and then show the yellow card.

Any referee not following this procedure, for example by flashing the card, can expect to have it noted in their Observer report. It could take an 8.0 to a 7.0 for Application of Law.
Surely this is unfair as correct caution procedure isn’t in law? Correct me if I’m wrong but I’m fairly certain it isn’t.
 

JH

Well-Known Member
#14
As @Brian Hamilton says, that policy is against FA guidence. Only L1 and 2A are allowed this policy.
If there is an appeal, how can you define a claim of mistaken identity if you don't take the name? The FA would have to let the player off and possible charge you for failing to follow correct procedure. If you were on a promotion scheme, that could cost you the next level.

Also, some referees are taking the names by use of their smartwatches and apps. While the FA guidance does not cover this directly, you need to show that you understand the reasoning.

If you have teamsheets, put the names in the book before you commence the game - soooo much easier.
As for mistaken identity, it's a league rule to have correct numbering on teamsheets, therefore I can be pretty sure I have the right name, and I check this with the managers after the game.

Having said that, you have converted me, I'll follow correct procedure from now on and as someone else said, the delay may help take the sting out of the game anyway.
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
#16
Is there a difference between a Law, a Protocol and a Guidance? I know a lawyer would chew you up on those!!
Yeh. An observation comprises a number of criteria. Only 1 of those is application of law.
There are other such as match control and fitness that just arent covered by law. Positioning is to a certain extent but is still a subjective issue.
Therefore when being observed you are not only being judged on law there are many factors which are detailed in the observer handbook 1 of which is the expected procedure to be followed when issuing a caution.
 
#18
Spaniard here. We never take names. If I were asking the booked player for his name, he’d probably laugh at me... for good reasons.

He’ve transferred correction of line-ups to the teams. We did it so long ago that I wasn’t born when it happened. Prior to the game, the club must hand us in the licences of all their players and substitutes with a clear indication of the numbers they use. Let’s say that a team doing this 30 minutes before KO would be doing it very late, as this is the moment my crew and I begin our warm-up routine. If there’s a mistake in their line-up, no worries, they lose the game.

Some times I need to flash the card -mind the reckless tackle where everybody expects the card and the offended is clearly ok. Other times I take some seconds: first things first, the yellow card comes out the pocket so everyone knows it’s gonna be a caution, then I deal with whatever I have to deal with (e.g. asking the offended if he wants assistance), then the offender comes and is properly shown the card.
 
#20
hi sam, so do you write the players number and the time and can spanish referees buy the red/yellow cards with the emblem on then,
I write number, name, and reason (I use shortenings, actually).

Unfortunately, there are no cards given to us with the emblem on them - I use Refsworld’s with card skins. However, some retailers sell their own version. Let me know if you want me to facilitate you a link.
 
Top