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Attacker and defender definitions

one

RefChat Addict
#1
Just an observation that while the terms (or attacking/defending team) are used frequently in law, there is no definition for for them.

Although their use has not caused any issues and the intent of the relevant laws are clear it will be good to have proper definitions and the terms to be used consistently.

The way the terms are used in the game are not consistent. The back four or so are called defenders. Front 2-3 are called attackers/forwards. However generally the team without posession is the defending team and everyone in it including the striker is defending (even in the opponent's half). Same is the case for attacking team.

To make the point clear, Law 16: "A goal kick is awarded when the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, on the ground or in the air, having last touched a player of the attacking team, and a goal is not scored." This is clear and no dispute on what it means or intends. However, if a team is taking a corner they are attacking. The ball is passed to a forward who is staying back, who in turn attempts to pass it back to the keeper (killing time) with a miss kick which goes over his goal line near corner flag. The ball goes over the goal line last touched by a player from the attacking team but contrary to law 16 the outcome is a corner kick.
 

HRW

RefChat Addict
#3
Definitions -
Attack (in sport) make a forceful attempt to score a goal or point or otherwise gain an advantage against an opposing team or player.
Defend (in sport) protect one's goal or wicket rather than attempt to score against one's opponents.
 

GraemeS

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#4
Unusually, I think this is one of the things that the LOTG is clear and consistent on. Attacker always means the team that has the ball, defender always means the team that is trying to stop the attacking team scoring. I appreciate that the terms are used differently outside the LOTG, but for once, that's not the book's fault and I actually worry that trying to clarify may make something that is currently internally consistent less so.
 

HRW

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#6
so having ball on your own goal line having stopped it on the line, with 21 playes in the box coming at you - makes you the attacking team? I;d have thought that even possession in your own PA, you are still defending.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#8
Unusually, I think this is one of the things that the LOTG is clear and consistent on. Attacker always means the team that has the ball, defender always means the team that is trying to stop the attacking team scoring. I appreciate that the terms are used differently outside the LOTG, but for once, that's not the book's fault and I actually worry that trying to clarify may make something that is currently internally consistent less so.
See the example I used in OP for goal kick /corner kick. Your definition makes the lotg inconsistent / incorrect.

We alreay have a few different definitions and dissagreements :)
 
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Peter Grove

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#9
I think you're over-analysing it. In the context of the law, I don't think there's too much confusion over what is meant by the terms as and when used. In fact I think it's only if you try to force a specific, non-contextual (and unnecessarily precise) definition that you would run into trouble.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#10
I think you're over-analysing it. In the context of the law, I don't think there's too much confusion over what is meant by the terms as and when used. In fact I think it's only if you try to force a specific, non-contextual (and unnecessarily precise) definition that you would run into trouble.
Don't disagree. As I said in the OP, the intent of relevant laws are clear and a definition here will be a nice to have only. There are other areas of law to improve with much higher priority.
 
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