Ref4Me

A red card ?

Rory

Member
Level 7 Referee
You can get away with this for some things.

Offensive, insulting and abusive language or violent conduct are the two that you don't really have an option.

The fact you have came here and are thinking about it will stand you in good stead for the future.
Cheers mate
 
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Dino Ref

Active Member
Level 6 Referee
Just don't expect people to thank you when you make the "correct in law" decision.
Had a strange one today.

Center back gets medical treatment so I tell him to go off at the side and be waved back on.

Opposition corner comes in and they score.

Queue shouts from benches about not having a CB.

Same player goes down later in the game. Play on until the ball goes out as not a head injury or serious. "It's not the premier league ref".

Wave physio on at next stoppage and advise the player to leave the pitch again "what's this like we've already conceded one cause of it".
 
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Rory

Member
Level 7 Referee
Your first red card as a referee is a big deal, it's a match changing decision and players, coaches and spectators may well try to influence you.

You have to know the laws, specifically Law 12 and then have the courage and confidence to apply them.

It's not easy, though like everything it does get easier with time, experience and practice. Just don't expect people to thank you when you make the "correct in law" decision.
I’m going to read the rules again all this week and if theere is a incident again like that I will definitely use my red card
 

Rory

Member
Level 7 Referee
Had a strange one today.

Center back gets medical treatment so I tell him to go off at the side and be waved back on.

Opposition corner comes in and they score.

Queue shouts from benches about not having a CB.

Same player goes down later in the game. Play on until the ball goes out as not a head injury or serious. "It's not the premier league ref".

Wave physio on at next stoppage and advise the player to leave the pitch again "what's this like we've already conceded one cause of it".
i suppose it’s a case of not being able to please everybody
 

Dino Ref

Active Member
Level 6 Referee
i suppose it’s a case of not being able to please everybody
You'll soon learn that players / managers have no idea about the laws of the game.

Dare I say to the point that you can actually waffle yourself out of an incorrect one, though I wouldn't recommend it.
 

refeire

Active Member
Hello @Rory congrats on your first 2 games. Regarding the control element, don't worry about it. Every ref has gotten to points where they have practically lost control, especially in the early days. More than likely you didn't lose control, but you just didn't give the impression you were fully confident in yourself.

Body language, body language, body language. It is everything. You can make an incorrect decision, but if you make it with total confidence and can sell it with a handful of words, you can get away with a lot of errors. Obviously the idea is to not make them in the first place, but for when you inevitably do, your confident body language and tone will get you out of the hole. When people feel you are confident in what you are doing, they'll tend to back off. When they sense you are unsure (and believe me they will as you saw) they will pounce on it and try to destroy your confidence and confuse you. In essence they want to psychologically manipulate you so they can control the game through you, to the benefit of their team.

In this situation you had, it should have been a straight red as others have said (offinabus). If it was a case he said it quietly and nobody heard, you may have even been able to let it slide (enough trouble will find you, you don't have to go looking for it with a "I heard that!"). The idea of trying to get him subbed is a good idea but I would suggest you reserve that for less severe cases, i.e. not straight reds (serious foul play, offinabus, violent conduct etc). You may wish to do what you did when you have a player on a yellow and he doesn't appear to be calming down with his challenges. You go over and say "I suggest you change #5, he is on a yellow and is playing like he wants another". You are alerting the coach to a problem, and you are giving him a solution. Human behaviour is to take the solution when posed a problem.

The solution element is key, "ref our keeper hasn't got a keeper jersey, he wants to wear a nike black jersey" .. "ok no problem, wear the black but just stick a bib on top so you don't clash with my kit, thanks". Rather than "you must find a keeper jersey otherwise you can't play". You provide solutions that suit your needs and also provide them a pathway to fulfill their needs (which in reality are your own wants and wishes). Yes it's manipulative, but it's for the greater good :D

You could write a book about referee interactions, you will eventually pick it all up. For now, body language, and brush yourself up on the laws. This will give confidence which will help you mentally on the pitch. Lastly, one of the easiest ways to lose control of a game is bad foul identification. Missed fouls = feelings of injustice = wanting revenge = war. Perhaps find some sources to sharpen your foul identification skills to make sure this doesn't happen.
 
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Rory

Member
Level 7 Referee
Hello @Rory congrats on your first 2 games. Regarding the control element, don't worry about it. Every ref has gotten to points where they have practically lost control, especially in the early days. More than likely you didn't lose control, but you just didn't give the impression you were fully confident in yourself.

Body language, body language, body language. It is everything. You can make an incorrect decision, but if you make it with total confidence and can sell it with a handful of words, you can get away with a lot of errors. Obviously the idea is to not make them in the first place, but for when you inevitably do, your confident body language and tone will get you out of the hole. When people feel you are confident in what you are doing, they'll tend to back off. When they sense you are unsure (and believe me they will as you saw) they will pounce on it and try to destroy your confidence and confuse you. In essence they want to psychologically manipulate you so they can control the game through you, to the benefit of their team.

In this situation you had, it should have been a straight red as others have said (offinabus). If it was a case he said it quietly and nobody heard, you may have even been able to let it slide (enough trouble will find you, you don't have to go looking for it with a "I heard that!"). The idea of trying to get him subbed is a good idea but I would suggest you reserve that for less severe cases, i.e. not straight reds (serious foul play, offinabus, violent conduct etc). You may wish to do what you did when you have a player on a yellow and he doesn't appear to be calming down with his challenges. You go over and say "I suggest you change #5, he is on a yellow and is playing like he wants another". You are alerting the coach to a problem, and you are giving him a solution. Human behaviour is to take the solution when posed a problem.

The solution element is key, "ref our keeper hasn't got a keeper jersey, he wants to wear a nike black jersey" .. "ok no problem, wear the black but just stick a bib on top so you don't clash with my kit, thanks". Rather than "you must find a keeper jersey otherwise you can't play". You provide solutions that suit your needs and also provide them a pathway to fulfill their needs (which in reality are your own wants and wishes). Yes it's manipulative, but it's for the greater good :D

You could write a book about referee interactions, you will eventually pick it all up. For now, body language, and brush yourself up on the laws. This will give confidence which will help you mentally on the pitch. Lastly, one of the easiest ways to lose control of a game is bad foul identification. Missed fouls = feelings of injustice = wanting revenge = war. Perhaps find some sources to sharpen your foul identification skills to make sure this doesn't happen.
Hello thank you for the reply that has really helped an given me more confidence to not give up and keep going and learning thank you
 
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